Skip to content
from the November 2017 issue

Roadkill

ロードキル

Japanese poet Hiromi Itō meditates on dislocation, violence, and shifting terrains of language in this narrative poem. 


It was the year the Persian Gulf War started and came to an end
I came on my own to California
I had no roots, no family with me, I felt like I could do no wrong
One day someone bewildered me by asking
What brought you here?
Translating it literally, the question sounded like What transported you to this place?
It wasn’t someone specific from somewhere, just a random person
What transported you?
The wind? An airplane?
I thought, it’s true I was transported here
But it’s also true I came on my own
I couldn’t summon up the words quickly
Back then, I couldn’t catch what people were saying
Even if I did, the idioms they used were unfamiliar
I couldn’t convey what I wanted to say
So I mulled the meaning of the question what brought you
Until I understood the words brought here
I wondered, what did bring me here?
And this was my reply
(But by the time I thought of this answer, the person who had asked was gone
So I’ve been repeating this answer to myself ever since)
To see a coyote
To listen to the sounds of the dark night
(A long time ago, I read a poem by the Owl-Woman of the Papago Tribe
In the great night my heart will go out,
Toward me the darkness comes rattling
In the great night my heart will go out
)
To research spells
To observe rainclouds
To kill a coyote
But I was possessed, I meant to kill but was possessed
I became preoccupied with sex, it was all I did, I had to have a man
If one was there, if he was erect, I had to have him, my vagina opened and closed
I swallowed his penis
It didn’t matter if it was night or day
It didn’t matter if others were there or not
He’d enter me quickly in the clumps of glass
Flip up my skirt
I was possessed by the coyote
Not because I wanted to, not because of sexual desire
I wanted to confirm through bumping bodies together

Through crying out aaah (it hurts), aaah (it hurts)
To confirm
Where I was
That I had worth
Where I was
That I had worth
(I felt as if I was nowhere, I couldn’t imagine I was worth a thing)
I did the same thing over and over, over and over
I was confused about sex, I did it, confused
I’d forget how for a moment when trying it with someone new
I had to remember and try my best
To drive out the coyote that had possessed me
To kill the coyote I’d driven out
There were lots of corpses on the road
On the freeways and on the small side roads
Some on their side, some squashed flat
Someone told me
That’s called “roadkill”
I remember where I first heard that, I remember the voice
I remember the way it pronounced the English word but
I forgot the speaker’s name
It wasn’t someone specific from somewhere, just a random person
This is how the word is used:
“I saw a piece of roadkill in the street”
“Roadkill’s something you get used to seeing in America”
“You know you can eat roadkill? There’s a cookbook about it”
But why does roadkill end with kill
And not killed?
It has been killed, it isn’t doing the killing
Even though it’s just like the words School Kill
But doesn’t imply any malice
To be more precise
ROADKILL = Animals fatally struck by or run over by vehicles on roads and freeways
To translate it more precisely
ROAD WHO KILLS = The road who kills animals, fatally striking them down or running
them over with vehicles on streets or on freeways
The road, kills
I, we, road, kill
I, we, road, kills
I am, we are road, kill
I am, we are road, killed
I am, we are road, killed dead
I watch, we watch with open eyes as
I am, we are torn to pieces and scattered in the wind

Here is some of the kill I have seen on the road
Opossum: White face, eyes closed, mouth open
Skunk: Dead ones can be detected miles ahead from scent alone
Raccoon: The tail was the only sign of what it was, the rest was a lump of meat
Rabbits. Squirrels. Deer. Crows. Hawks. Dogs. And cats. Two at once.
Something I couldn’t identify, like a tanuki, two at once, big and small
A mother crossing the road with a baby in her mouth, I guess
Road killed
(The remaining babies must have died alone in their den)
And a coyote
Legs splayed, strength gone
Original shape destroyed, covered in blood
The road kills, kills and kills, kills completely
It was the year the Persian Gulf War started and came to an end
That I came here
To catch a whiff of the coyote’s scent
To observe rainclouds
To listen to the sounds of dark night
To stay awake through the night darkness
To eat the flesh of the coyote and wear its pelt
The roadsides were decorated with yellow ribbons for victory
Kill, kill, kill, kill, kill
Kill, kill, kill, kill, kill
The corpses on the road and roadsides
Raised their voices in unison as they returned the volley of violence
Raised their voices in unison as they returned the power of death

 

Author’s note: This poem contains quotes from the Wikipedia article “Roadkill” and A. Grove Day’s The Sky Clears: Poetry of the American Indians.

*Translator’s note: In a 1997 incident that rocked the Japanese nation, a fourteen-year-old in Kōbe committed two murders. In the first, he cut off a fellow student’s head and stuffed a note signed (in English) “School Kill” in the victim’s mouth. 
 

© Hiromi Itō. By arrangement with the author. Translation © 2017 by Jeffrey Angles. All rights reserved.

ロードキル

湾岸戦争がはじまって終わった年に、
わたしはひとりでカリフォルニアにいき 、
根っこもない家族もない、おしっこもうんこもでないような顔して、
そのままそこで暮らしました、
ある日だれかに、
What brought you here? 
ときかれてへどもどしました、
直訳すれば、何がはこんだか、あなたをここに、
どこの誰でもない、通りすがりの人でした、
何が、はこんだか?
風に? 飛行機に?
はこばれたのはほんとうだけど、
ほんとうは自分で来たんだよ、と思いましたが、
いえなかったです、咄嗟には、
その頃はまだ人のいってることばが聞きとれなかったし、
聞きとれても慣用句を知らなかったし、
いいたいことを伝えることもできなかった、それで、
WHAT BROUGHT YOU 問いの意味を
吟味し、吟味し、BROUGHT
HERE 理解し、
WHAT BROUGHT YOU HERE 考えました、
以下が答えです、
(考えついた頃には、質問した人はどこかへ行ってしまいました
だから今までひとりで答えてきました)
コヨーテを見るために
闇夜の音を聴くために
(むかしパパゴ族のフクロウ女の詩を読みました
In the great night my heart will go out,  大きな夜にはわたしの心が出てゆくだろう
Toward me the darkness comes rattling 闇がカラカラやって来る
In the great night my heart will go out. 大きな夜にはわたしの心が出てゆくだろう)
まじないの研究に
雨雲の観察に
コヨーテを殺すために

そのうち憑かれちゃった、殺すつもりで憑かれちゃった、
セックスに夢中になってそれしかしてなくてそれは男じゃなきゃだめで、
いてもたってもいられなくなってあたしのヴァギナは閉じたり開いたりし、
ペニスをのみこみ、
夜でも昼でも、
他人がいてもいなくても、
草の繁るなかにずんずん入っていった、
そしてスカートをめくりあげた、
コヨーテに憑かれてたんです、
したくてしてたんじゃないんです性欲なんかなかったんです、
ただカラダをぶつけて、
あ(イタイ)あ(イタイ)と声をあげて確認したかったんです、
わたしはどこにいるか
わたしは価値があるか
どこにいるか
価値があるか
(どこにもいないような気がしてたし価値なんかあるとは思えなかったから)
くりかえしくりかえし同じことをしましたが、
セックスはどぎまぎします、します、どぎまぎ、
はじめての人とは一瞬やり方がわからなくなるので、
思い出して、がんばるんです、
憑いたコヨーテを祓うために
祓ってコヨーテを殺すために

路上には死骸がいっぱいありました、
フリーウェイでも細い脇道でも、
ころがっていたりつぶれていたり、
あれは「ロードキル」っていうのだ
とだれかがわたしにいいました、
最初にきいたときの場所も、それをいった人の声も、覚えています、
その英語の発音も、覚えていますけど、
その人の名前は、忘れてしまいました、
どこの誰でもない、通りすがりの人でした、
こんなふうに使います、
「わたしは、見た、ひとつのロードキルを、路上で」
「ロードキルは、見慣れた風景、アメリカにおける」
「知ってますか、ロードキルは食べられる、料理本も出版されている」
しかしなぜROAD KILLなのか
KILLED じゃないのか
殺されてるじゃないか、殺してないじゃないか
SCHOOL KILLにそっくりなのに
悪意がぜんぜん感じられないじゃないか
正確にいえば
ROADKILL : Animals fatally struck by or ridden over by vehicles on roads and freeways
正確に訳せば
道、殺ス: 動物たち、致命的に、はねられた、ないしは轢かれた、車両によって、路上で、また高速道路上で
道、殺ス
わたしはわたしたちは、道、殺シ
わたしはわたしたちは、道、殺シテ
わたしはわたしたちは、道、殺サレ
わたしはわたしたちは、道、殺サレテ
ずたずたに引き裂かれて風に散って
いくのをジッとみつめます

で、わたしのみつめた道、殺スはこんなのです、
オポッサム。白い顔で目を閉じて口を開けている
スカンク。何マイルも先から死んだことがわかる、においで
アライグマ。身元がわかるのはしっぽだけ、あとは肉塊
ウサギ。リス。シカ。カラス。タカ。イヌ。そしてネコ。それから
種は特定できなかったがタヌキ大の動物、大と小、二匹同時に
推し測るに、母が仔をくわえて渡ろうとした瞬間
道、殺サレタ
(残りの仔も巣穴の中で死に絶えた)
それからコヨーテ
足のつっぱったのや力の萎えたのや
原型をとどめないのや血まみれのや
道、殺ス、殺シテ殺シテ、殺シキル

湾岸戦争がはじまって終わった年でした、
わたしは、コヨーテの体臭を嗅ぎつけるために
雨雲の観察するために
闇夜の音を聴くために
闇夜に眠らないために
コヨーテの肉を食って毛皮を着るために
やって来ました、
道の両側には戦勝の黄色いリボンが一斉に飾られてありました、
道の上、道の端では死骸たちが、
殺セ、殺セ、殺セ、殺セ、殺セ、殺セ、
殺セ、殺セ、殺セ、殺セ、殺セ、殺セ、
受けた暴力をはね返して一斉に叫びました、
死の力をはね返して一斉に叫びました、

 

Wikipedia およびThe Sky Clear (A. Grove Day) から引用があります 

Like what you read? Help WWB bring you the best new writing from around the world.