Category: Dispatches

April, 2016

On Translation: Push and Dig

Reading Haviva Pedaya’s “A Poem for Rachel Corrie”   Haviva Pedaya’s poem, “A Poem for Rachel Corrie” (in Hebrew, “Shir le-Rachel Corrie”) was written in the immediate aftermath of the death of the American activist Rachel...

2016 Man Booker International Prize Finalists at Words without Borders

The Man Booker International Prize is awarded annually to a single work of international fiction that has been translated into English and published in the UK. The 2016 longlist of thirteen works was announced on March 10, 2016, followed by the shortlist on April 14....

The City and the Writer: In Wellington, NZ with Chris Price

Author Photo: Robert Cross If each city is like a game of chess, the day when I have learned the rules, I shall finally possess my empire, even if I shall never succeed in knowing all the cities it contains.                      ...

2016 Man Booker International Q&A: Jessica Moore

Jessica Moore was longlisted for the 2016 Man Booker International Prize for her translation of Maylis de Kerangal's Mend the Living. Her other translations include Maylis de Kerangal's Birth of a Bridge and Jean-François...

2016 Man Booker International Q&A: Charlotte Collins

Charlotte Collins is shortlisted for the 2016 Man Booker International Prize for her translation of Robert Seethaler's A Whole Life. Charlotte's other translations include Robert Seethaler's forthcoming novel The Tobacconist, Nina Haratischwill's play Liv...

2016 Man Booker International Q&A: Jordan Stump

Jordan Stump was longlisted for the 2016 Man Booker International Prize for his translation of Marie NDiaye's Ladivine. Jordan's has translated many authors from French, including Marie Redonnet, Eric Chevillard, and Honoré de Balzaz. His translation of Claude...

2016 Man Booker International Q&A: Eka Kurniawan

Eka Kurniawan and his translator Labodalih Sembiring were longlisted for the 2016 Man Booker International Prize for Man Tiger. Eka was born in Tasikmalaya, Indonesia in 1975, and he studied philosophy at Gadjah Mada University, Yogyakarta. His novels, including Man...

2016 Man Booker International Q&A: Labodalih Sembiring

Labodalih Sembiring was longlisted for the 2016 Man Booker International Prize for his translation of Eka Kurniawan's Man Tiger. Labodalih Sembiring is the pen name of Muhammad Dalih Akbar Sembiring. Born in North Sumatra, the ex-features journalist currently lives in...

2016 Man Booker International Q&A: José Eduardo Agualusa

José Eduardo Agualusa and his translator Daniel Hahn are shortlisted for the 2016 Man Booker International Prize for A General Theory of Oblivion. José was born in Huambo, Angola in 1960. His other works include The Book of Chameleons, the winner of the...

2016 Man Booker International Q&A: Daniel Hahn

Daniel Hahn is shortlisted for the 2016 Man Booker International Prize for his translation of José Eduardo Agualusa's A General Theory of Oblivion. His other translations include fiction by José Luís Peixoto, and nonfiction by writers ranging from...

2016 Man Booker International Q&A: Deborah Smith

Deborah Smith's translations from the Korean include two novels by Han Kang, The Vegetarian (shortlisted for the 2016 Man Booker International Prize) and Human Acts, and two by Bae Suah, A Greater Music and Recitation. In 2015 Deborah completed a PhD...

2016 Man Booker International Q&A: Stefan Tobler

Stefan Tobler was longlisted for the 2016 Man Booker International Prize for his translation of Raduan Nassar's A Cup of Rage. Stefan's other translations include the works of Rodrigo de Souza Leão and Clarice Lispector. He is the founder of And...

WWB at AWP

WWB's panel at AWP: Karen Emmerich and Kareem James Abu-Zeid (top photo); Edward Gauvin, Shabnam Nadiya, and Susan Harris (bottom photo) Last week, WWB was in Los Angeles for the annual Association of Writers and Writing Programs (AWP) conference. Editorial director Susan Harris...

2016 Man Booker International Q&A: Emily Jeremiah & Fleur Jeremiah

Emily Jeremiah and Fleur Jeremiah are the translators of Aki Ollikainen's White Hunger (2015), which was longlisted for the 2016 Man Booker International Prize. Emily and Fleur Jeremiah's translations include Asko Sahlberg’s Brothers (Peirene...

2016 Man Booker International Q&A: Aki Ollikainen

Aki Ollikainen and his translators Emily Jeremiah and Fleur Jeremiah were longlisted for the 2016 Man Booker International Prize for White Hunger. Ollikainen's second book, Musta satu (Black Tale), was published in 2015. He was born in 1973 in...

2016 Man Booker International Q&A: Roland Glasser

Roland Glasser is the translator of Fiston Mwanza Mujila's Tram 83 (2015), which was longlisted for the 2016 Man Booker International Prize. He translates literary and genre fiction from French, as well as art, travel, and assorted non-fiction. He studied theatre,...

2016 Man Booker International Q&A: Fiston Mwanza Mujila

Fiston Mwanza Mujila and his translator Roland Glasser were longlisted for the 2016 Man Booker International Prize for Tram 83. Fiston was born in 1981 in Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of Congo, where he went to a Catholic school before studying literature and human...

2016 Man Booker International Q&A: Carlos Rojas

Carlos Rojas is the translator of Yan Lianke's The Four Books (2015), which is shortlisted for the 2016 Man Booker International Prize. His other translations include Yan Lianke's Lenin's Kisses (2012), and Yu Hua's Brothers: A Novel (2009),...

2016 Man Booker International Q&A: Yan Lianke

Yan Lianke was born in 1958 in Henan Province, China. He is the author of many novels and short story collections and has won China's two top literary awards, the Lu Xun in 2000 for Nian, yue, ri (The Year, the Month, the Day) and the Lao She in 2004...

Tweeting our Greatest Hits for #NPM16

In honor of National Poetry Month, Words Without Borders will be tweeting some of the best worldwide poetry in translation from our archives, selected by our editorial director Susan Harris. We begin with Burundian poet Ketty Nivyabandi's "Izina." In the coming weeks, look...

March, 2016

An Interview with Najat El Hachmi

Words Without Borders speaks with Moroccan-Catalan writer Najat El Hachmi about language, identity, and the possibilities and limits of translation. Writer Najat El Hachmi (left) and her novel La filla estrangera (right) Najat El Hachmi was born in Morocco...

From the Translator: On “A Red Lighter in the Heart of M.”

Collusion in French Watermelon Sugar. Collaboration through a Common Denominator. Abbaye Sainte-Marie de Lagrasse, a Benedictine abbey rebuilt in the late eight century, and the location of the translation residency where Chris Clarke met Mohammed El Khadiri, whose story A Red...

The City and the Writer: In Santa Fe with Valerie Martínez

If each city is like a game of chess, the day when I have learned the rules, I shall finally possess my empire, even if I shall never succeed in knowing all the cities it contains.                              ...

From the Translator: On “They Told You”

Olivia Baes's translation of Khadija Arouhal's They Told You appears in the March 2016 Words without Borders issue on Moroccan literature. When Emma Ramadan asked me to translate Khadija Arouhal’s poem “They Told You,” I was honored and...

An Interview with Fouad Laroui

Words Without Borders caught up with Fouad Laroui, whose Prix Goncourt-winning story was published in WWB's Moroccan literature issue. We spoke about creativity, dislocation, the absurd, and his forthcoming collection, The Curious Case of Dassoukine’s...

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