Skip to content

Keywords

Articles tagged "Buddhism"

From the Great Stele of Phimeanakas

Photo: Sharon May, “Apsaras, Angkor Wat, Cambodia” (2009) Queen Indradevi’s Sanskrit composition (c. 1190–1200 AD), inscribed on the large stele found at Phimeanakas in Siem Reap province, Cambodia, reveals a nearly flawless command of the language and its complex poetic forms. The poem was discovered in the stone rubble of the palace temple in 1916. The stele, believed to have been entirely covered in gold, comprises 102 stanzas; the final stanzas are...

An Introduction to Sri Lankan Literature

Sri Lanka, which boasts a 92% rate of literacy—the highest in South Asia and among the highest in Asia—has a long storytelling tradition. What is perhaps special about literature in this country is the extent to which the oral tradition has complemented a vast body of literature spanning many genres in written form. Given the powerful impetus that Buddhism had and has on scholarship and literature in Sri Lanka, both prose and verse in the country have drawn heavily from...

The Hunter in the Wilderness of Sansara

A long time ago, sixteen leagues from our village, Navagaththegama, there lived the hunter. The area was called Mullegama Galkanda. The hunter lived on Mullegama Rock and in the surrounding jungle. The impenetrable area between our village and the Thammannar-Anuradhapura road was covered by thick jungle. Regardless of its length and breadth, it is the wilderness proximate to Mullegama Galkanda, which lay sixteen leagues from our village, that is of importance to our story, and...

The Idol’s Dust

Boom . . . m . . . m . . . The terrible sound of something exploding and collapsing . . . The awe of explosion and dynamite . . . A huge amount of explosives had been used. The devastating explosion, accompanied by the loud cries of god-is-greater that made the throats of the Talibs quiver, set the earth atremble; a dense, impenetrable cloud of dust billowed up into the sky. The explosion tore the Buddha from the embrace of the mountain and flung it into the valley. The Buddha had...

The Novice at Songgwang Temple

In the mid Joseon period, when Buddhism was only practiced high in the mountains, a mendicant monk heard that the head monk at Songgwang Temple in Jogye Mountain renowned in the Way, was encouraging monastic practice, and came from the North to see him. Below the temple, the river turns into a stream and as he climbed up alongside the stream a cabbage leaf came floating down on the water. Seeing that, the wandering monk exclaimed: 'Why, I've come on a fool's errand....

In the Mountains, Sent to Ch’an Brothers and Sisters

Dharma companions filling mountains, a sangha1 forms of itself: chanting, sitting ch'an2 stillness. Looking out from distant city walls, people see only white clouds. 1A community of Buddhist practitioners. 2Ch'an is the Chinese translation of dhyana, Sanskrit for "sitting meditation." The Ch'an (Zen) Buddhist sect takes that name because it focuses so resolutely on sitting meditation. From Mountain Home: The Wilderness Poetry of Ancient China, forthcoming...

Like what you read? Help WWB bring you the best new writing from around the world.