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Articles tagged "Cervantes"

WWB Weekend: Beach Reading

Image: Postcard of the Bahia Honda Bridge, Key West, Florida, 1930-1945. The Boston Public Library. As scores of people head to the shore for the weekend, we’re summering with “Islamorada,” Rivka Keren’s taut story of a Florida Keys vacation turned moral test. In the island town of the title, a bickering couple, Ernest and Amalia, are interrupted by a young man bursting into their hotel room. He’s not a robber but a Cuban refugee, the...

WWB Weekend: Quixotic Visions

Portrait of Miguel de Cervantes y Saavedra, Juan de Jauregui y Aguilar, Wikimedia Commons  Last week the world mourned the death and celebrated the life of a uniquely creative, internationally famed, widely prolific, flamboyantly attired artist: Miguel de Cervantes, who died four hundred years ago April 22. Much has been made of the coincidence of his death date with Shakespeare’s, and multiple observances, many involving period garb, have ensued. There’s no ruff required...

Valeria Luiselli’s “The Story of My Teeth”

In 1934, at the beginning of the summer, during a ten-day voyage across the Atlantic Ocean to New York City, Thomas Mann—the magisterial German writer whose lifelong dental preoccupations led him to kill Herr Buddenbrooks with a bad toothache and endow the otherwise immaculate Tadzio of Death in Venice with wonky teeth—decided to read Don Quixote for the first time. Between luxurious meals, tea times, and shuffleboard matches, Mann read in a deckchair and composed the essay...

Islamorada

During the twilight hours of one day in January, the professor and his wife arrived at a small motel on the beach at Islamorada, and checked in. After the New Year’s Eve parties, the place had emptied of guests.  It was hot and humid. Seaweed and snails piled up along the main road. Alongside the boats that docked in the marina, pelicans stood like statues on beams of rotted wood. The couple were exhausted and sweaty after their long drive.  They showered, changed into...

from “Why Translation Matters”

Why translation matters: the subject is so huge, so complex, and so dear to my heart that I have decided to begin my approach to it by answering the implicit question with another question, using the technique of query-as-response—a traditional, perhaps time-honored method of indicating the almost impenetrable difficulty of a subject, and certainly, as every pedagogue knows, a good way to delay and even confound the questioner until you can think of an acceptable answer that has at...

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