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Articles tagged "Estonia"

“The Ropewalker: Between Three Plagues, Volume I” by Jaan Kross

Estonian novelist Jaan Kross (1920–2007) began his literary career in the 1950s after returning from the Siberian labor camps where he spent eight years, having been accused by Soviet authorities of Estonian nationalism. Often considered the greatest Estonian novelist of the last quarter of the twentieth century, several of his works have previously been translated into English: The Czar’s Madman (1993) and Professor...

From the Contributor: fs, Poet and DJ

You already know that October issue contributor fs is a poet. (You can find his poem "[i wish there was a god]" from this month's issue of Estonian literature here.) What you may not have realized is that he's also a DJ. We asked him to put together a playlist of music by Estonian bands. Here they are for your listening pleasure. Shelton San, "Well-Behaved" St. Cheatersburg, "We Are the Pigeons of the World" Holy Motors, "Stay the Night" Pedigree & Lesle Da Bass,...

Writing from the Edge: Estonian Literature

The borders of Estonia are largely watery, lying in the Baltic Sea, the Gulfs of Finland and Riga, and Lake Peipsi. The briny perimeter of over a thousand islands adds more coastline, while over a thousand lakes hold water inland. Half of the land is covered with dense forest, much of it primeval and untouched by human hand, home to the brown bear, the elk and the flying squirrel; a further quarter is deep and soft with ancient bogs and mires that are rich in wild orchids and amber-colored...

A Dog’s Life

The dog ran round the corner, his fur shaggy and matted, and stayed there, sheltering from the wind and panting heavily. From a distance it looked as if he was leaning his shoulder against the building, which made him look even more human. He was old and filthy and probably hadn’t eaten for some time, since when I got close he looked straight at me with his light-brown, gummy eyes and started wagging his tail. His whole body wriggled along with that one body part that expresses a...

from “Purge”

When the Baltic Germans were invited into Germany in the fall of 1939, one of the sisters’ German classmates from school and confirmation classes came to say good-bye, and promised to return. She was just going to make a tour of a country that she’d never seen before, and then she would come back and tell them what Germany was really like. They waved good-bye and Aliide watched as Hans’s hands wrapped around Ingel’s waist and moved toward her rear end. Their...

Russian

Estonian

“Idleness Is Often Empowering . . . ”

Idleness is often empowering, recreating oneself— just as the moon gradually grows full once again, a battery surely and steadily recharges, so everything, everyone must have time for the self— for mirth and laziness time to be human. Translation of "Jõedeaeg on tihti jõuaeg." Copyright Doris Kareva. By arrangement with the author. Translation copyright 2007 by Tiina Aleman. All rights reserved.

“The sparks from your firesmoky eyes”

The sparks from your firesmoky eyes kept the room warm for hours, days, weeks, and months. I recognized that feeling: the glow. I recognized that feeling. Although it happened in another time, another film. When you photographed the paradise trees and I talked with the birds. Neither of us tasted anything there, did we? Translation of "Need sädemed Su tulesuitsusilmis." Copyright Doris Kareva. Translation copyright 2007 by Tiina Aleman. All rights...

“The reader casts his shadow over the poem”

The reader casts his shadow over the poem. What did you actually say: The vase is here or The sky is blue? All possibilities bloom in language, the mind hears but what it wants to or what it fears. The deaf man laments. The vase is here and The sky is blue in some ways are one and the same. In some ways and in some people a riddle is fathomable, the answer a sparkle. The sparkle solves it. Nearness defines it. Translation of "Luuletusele langeb lugeja...

Avatud!

On April 27th the Estonian government took down a statue of a Russian soldier in a small park next to the national library in the capital city of Tallinn. Local Russians, nearly a third of the 1.5 million population, had taken to gathering at the monument to hold rallies calling for a return to the good old Soviet days. Since the Soviet Union gave up their occupation of Estonia in 1991, many Russians chose to stay in the newly free country, since it had far more opportunities than their...
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