Articles tagged "French Literature"


New Fiction in Translation: From “Paris Vagabond”

Photograph: Patrice Molinard Jean Paul-Clébert's Paris Vagabond will be published by New York Review Books on April 12, 2016. The forthcoming edition is translated by...

Saad

Saad bursts into the bedroom, where David is resting after lunch, and declares: “They’re coming! Quick, Monsieur David, let’s go see them!” The whole town seems to race...

Abandoning Myself

Burning, the needle that gently scrapes my skin, that doesn’t press very deep, that moves along slowly, that skims my flesh beneath the surface, that injects black ink blood between the two...

The Conspiracists

One day, an uncle of mine called Alphonse sent me to get advice from his childhood friend who’d become a policeman. The friend’s name was Anatole Rabe. He’d steadily climbed the...

Nenitou

Crayfish leap backward in huge bounds, which I loved. But later, I’d find their own excrement in their heads.   Lord Rat washes his face, he is bald. Lady Mouse trills, she is toothless....

Blastomycosis

Before starting his nightly route, Lemizo patted himself down to make sure that he had all the tools of his trade. On his left shoulder: a scrap paper bag glued around a large, empty, white metal...

Wife Sold at Auction

On this morning, the old musician stops playing the moment I bend my lanky bag of bones and squeeze through the tiny doorframe of his home. I’ve stopped greeting him, at least while he’s...

The Avenging Whip

The weather’s so hot at the moment that I can’t be assed to do anything. I spend all day vegging out in front of the TV, watching shows aimed at the unemployed, even though I have a real...

Cinépanorama

“My son can ensnare you, you know. It comes right out of his eye.” —Edith Arnold-Delon   1954 Service number T 1023 T53. You board in Toulon, headed for Indochina. Another...

New in French: Les Sauvages by Sabri Louatah

Les Sauvages (“The Barbarians”), the first novel by Parisian writer Sabri Louatah, is a turbulent portrait of a contemporary France divided between a desire for globalization and a wave...

Writing the Rack That Wracks Us: On Translating the Poetry of Marie-Claire Bancquart

One of the many things I have Marie-Claire Bancquart to thank for is introducing me to the world of things. I don’t mean an initiation into the pleasures of 24/7 QVC or a penchant for crying...

The Week in Translation

what: French Literature in the Making: Jérôme Ferrari where: Maison Français of NYU when: Monday, February 24, 7pm more info: http://ow.ly/tsHQ2 what: French Literature...

From the Translator: Tintin in the Land of Foreign Affairs

In 2006, Tom McCarthy claimed that the pages of Tintin contained the secret of literature; in 2010, Abel Lanzac and Christophe Blain declared that Tintin held the secret of making a good political...

The Week in Translation

what: French Literature in the Making: Jérôme Ferrari where: Maison Français of NYU when: Monday, February 24, 7pm more info: http://ow.ly/tsHQ2 what: French Literature...

The Week in Translation

what: Kafka Translated: A panel discussion on translating Kafka with Michelle Woods, Mark Harman (translator of The Castle and Amerika), Susan Bernofsky (translator...

The Stations of the Cry

This is the tale of a lengthy journey. A step-by-step journey, one inspired by a misfortune that took place in the court of the Hungarian Prince Esterházy, in November 1772, in the city of...

Infinity, Minus Forty Yearly Installments: Noun Complements (1972–2012)

1. In September 1972, funded by a scholarship, I took the Orient Express to Vienna. Sixteen-hour journey, upper bunk. Less than enthusiastic about sharing a room in the student hostel, I looked for a...

The Life You Save May Be Your Own

Canada Dry Spoonerisms 1. A Sicilian caterwauls, except in Apulia. 2. The archaeologist’s wife does love a serious excavation. 3. How adroit you are with your crocuses! 4. The seafarer...

The Opposing Shore

The room is covered in dead leaves. Two benches are placed just so, conjuring up a bucolic garden scene, in the first days of fall, in the countryside, waiting for the season to roll by and take...

Edward Gauvin on Being Translated

Georges-Olivier Châteaureynaud recently did me the honor not only of translating one of my short stories, but of finding that translation a French home. My first published translation, and...

The Week in Translation

SUBMIT what: The French-American Foundation and the Florence Gould Foundation are currently accepting submissions for the Annual Translation Prize—a $10,000 cash award for the best English...

A Review of Edouard Levé‘s \“Autoportrait\”

Self-portraiture occupied the French photographer and novelist Edouard Levé throughout his career, but his third novel, Autoportrait, remains his most thorough and sustained attempt in that...

The Week in Translation

GO what: "Monet to Mallarmé": Mary Ann Caws, Paul Legault, Susan Mitchell, and Laila Pedro read from the poetry of Stéphane Mallarmé, in French and...

The Red Loaf

Pluto Jedediah, dandy of the Caledonian Market, tells this tale: May dogs grow horns, I thought, waking on a bed in a seedy hotel, if I recall the creature for the sake of whose foot I found...

from “Daewoo”

Daewoo in Lorraine: Landmarks The blue building was empty, the name of the factory had been changed, and tough shit for the men and women who had been tossed out—"report to the occupational...

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