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Articles tagged "Greek"

The City and the Writer: In Alexandria with Khaled Raouf

October 2015 Special Series: Egypt     If each city is like a game of chess, the day when I have learned the rules, I shall finally possess my empire, even if I shall never succeed in knowing all the cities it contains.                —Italo Calvino, Invisible Cities Can you describe the mood of Alexandria as you feel/see it? Aida is an old woman who sells flowers on the streets of...

Translator Relay: Karen Emmerich

Our "Translator Relay" series features a new interview each month. This month's translator will choose the next interviewee, adding a different, sixth question. For October's installment, Bill Johnston passed the baton to Karen Emmerich, a prolific translator of Modern Greek poetry and prose. Her recent and forthcoming translations include Something Will Happen, You’ll See by Christos Ikonomou, The Scapegoat by Sophia Nikolaidou, and Why I Killed My Best Friend by...

Timon vs. Newton

Timon and Newton were arguing about fruit. Netwon said: "I prefer the apple since I discovered gravity while peacefully dozing under the shade of an apple tree." Timon shot back with stinging words: "Newton, you're an idiot, a fool and utterly conceited in your intelligence. By Zeus, do you know how to bring owls to Athens! Your argument reveals nothing new. All the still corpses that dangled from the branches of my fig tree fell straight to the ground, but, unlike Icarus,...

Timoniad

Sing, Muse, of that misanthrope, who was homeless and forever wandering, since he had yet to chop down his fig tree. In the city he ignored the many routine evils of most men as he strove to keep alive, with a sorrowful heart, his fig tree and the warm pot of food for his friends. But, hard as he tried, he could not save himself. The fool, ruined by his own wasteful ways, saw the amount of wealth he had squandered, all of the cows and goats he had eaten, while his friends...

An Interview with Dimitris Athinakis

The Greek poet Dimitris Athinakis came of age with the new millennium.  Raised in a Greece of fast and cataclysmic change, he belongs to a new generation of writers whose works are bringing brave new directions to the Modern Greek literary continuum.  Peter Constantine: We last met in clouds of tear gas during the May 2010 riots in Athens, in a Greece that seems markedly changed.  How does this new Greek reality affect you as a poet?     Dimitris...

from “Inside a Girl Like You”

October 27, 2006 Tamara, I’m writing to send you my new address. In case you’re still getting mail for me, you can forward it here: Katina Mela, Erodiou 8 (off Euripidou), Athens. I’ll find out the zip code and send that, too. The apartment here is smaller than ours, the main bedroom is more or less connected to the living room. Well, it’s separated by a sliding door, but you can hear everything if someone’s in the living room. (Not that there’s...

Drama Queen: An Interview with Ellen Stewart

Words Without Borders is proud to present the following interview conducted by Liesl Schillinger, speaking with Ellen Stewart in May, 2004. Ellen Stewart had just completed her epic Classical cycle Seven, with a wild new take on Antigone. Ellen Stewart founded the LaMaMa Experimental Theater Company in 1961, and her groundbreaking vision helped establish the careers of Sam Shepard, Philip Glass, Harvey Fierstein, Robert Wilson, Mabou Mines, and many others. Now in her 80s, she is...

Two Poems

The Oracles of the Virgin Music is the art which is most nigh to tears and memory.--Oscar Wilde Buried inside us were the sounds of the words our parents managed to utter in the moment of intercourse before they fell silent at the wonder of budding life. Buried inside us were the sounds of the songs we heard in the cradle before our mothers had forgotten the oracles of the Virgin. Buried inside us were the sounds of the grinding of...
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