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Articles tagged "Portuguese Literature"

WWB to Partner with Brazil’s “Revista Pessoa”

We’re excited to announce a new partnership with Brazil-based literary journal Revista Pessoa. Through the partnership, Revista Pessoa will feature selected work from WWB translated into Portuguese, while our readers will be able to access articles from Revista Pessoa in English on WWB. The exchange will generate greater global visibility for Words Without Borders contributors in what has been one of the world’s fastest-growing editorial markets in recent years. This is the...

João and Maria: An Excerpt from Susana Moreira Marques’s “Now and at the Hour of our Death”

The following is an excerpt from Susana Moreira Marques's Now and at the Hour of our Death, a nonfiction work that resulted from Moreira Marques's trip with a palliative care team to Trás-os-Montes, a forgotten corner of northern Portugal, a rural area abandoned by the young. While there, she visits villages where rural ways of life are disappearing. Her book presents stories from families facing death in their own words and through Moreira...

The Week in Translation

what: New Poetry from Spain: Round Table Discussion featuring Marta López-Luaces, Gerardo Piña-Rosales, and Leonard Schwartz when: Thursday, April 11, 7pm where: Instituto Cervantes, New York, NY more info: http://ow.ly/jRnlr Lorca in New York: A Celebration: the largest-ever festival in North America celebrating the work of acclaimed Spanish poet and playwright Federico García Lorca. With more than two dozen events throughout...

Seizing Cervantes

When it all began, that is, when the Skeptic Party rose to power in the United Kingdom, in 2070, I was completely in favor. The group’s plan to completely forbid religious practice pleased me greatly. I was brought up in an intellectual environment, the son of a family that never believed in any god and always associated the religious figure with some guy with a double-digit IQ or a fanatical human bomb. I admit, I voted for the Skeptic Party as soon as it came into existence. But...

Antonio Lobo Antunes’s “The Land at the End of the World

For many years, António Lobo Antunes and the late Nobel Laureate José Saramago have been widely considered the two leading men of letters in Portuguese literature, each with his own defenders and detractors. As men of Portugal, their various approaches to the country provide a striking comparison. Many of Saramago’s novels, for instance, might be called globally nonspecific, set in locales without name or where the backdrop is ancillary to the story. But for Lobo...

Borges’s Secretary

I don’t know when she discovered that I could no longer see.  Not even I had completely discerned this; I would look at books and judged that I could still see the pages, read them, understand them.  She, knowing the truth, was already devising her plan.  The process of distancing myself from books lasted many years.  And yet I felt closer and closer to them.  I read less each day, but since I worked in a library, I could feel them, smell them, leaf through...

Ernst and Mylia

Ernst Spengler was alone in his attic apartment, ready to throw himself out the already open window when, suddenly, the telephone rang. Once, twice, three times, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten, eleven, twelve, thirteen, fourteen, Ernst answered. Mylia lived on the first floor of 77 Moltke Street. Seated in an uncomfortable chair, she was thinking about the basic words of her life. Pain, she thought, pain was an essential word. She had undergone one operation, then another,...

Halfway to a House

I take light from the closet drawers. The first day of fall. And all those years at the bottom. Before, it wasn't me. It was a house under construction. I before myself. Now I dismantle the summer, dresses flying, naked feet beside a dress. Time loses itself in the change of the seasons, but in this loss someone exists in me. A voice laughs deep within the closet. The sun so low, in the bottom drawer.

The Woman Who Stole the Rain

I go to Lisbon on business fairly regularly. I get on a plane to go there, if not every month, then at least every six weeks or so. I understand the language well enough not to need an interpreter, having spent a good deal of my childhood and adolescence in Brazil, where my parents lived for some years, again for professional reasons. I know the city reasonably well too. Places we travel to frequently eventually do start to feel familiar, at least superficially, even when, at a deeper...

German Dolls

"German Dolls" takes Portuguese poet Fernando Pessoa (1888-1935) to Berlin. It is a text about memories--false and inaccurate, as memories always are--and how they interfere with the places we inhabit, the places we best know by getting lost in them (in the sense of choosing to vanish into them). Pessoa grew up in Durban and wrote his first poems in English. Apart from two trips from Portugal to South Africa, he rarely traveled, and so far as I know was never in Berlin. But his invention...

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