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Articles tagged "Rachel Morgenstern-clarren"

The Translator Relay: Tess Lewis

Our "Translator Relay" series features a new interview each month. This month's translator will choose the next interviewee, adding a different, sixth question. For May's installment, Donald Nicholson-Smith passed the baton to Tess Lewis, who is a translator from French and German, in addition to being an essayist and critic. Her translations include works by Peter Handke, Alois Hotschnig, Doron Rabinovici, Pascal Bruckner, E. M. Cioran, Jean-Luc Benoziglio, Anselm Kiefer, and...

The Translator Relay: Alyson Waters

Our "Translator Relay" series features a new interview each month. This month's translator will choose the next interviewee, adding a different, sixth question. For December's installment, Michael Emmerich passed the baton to Alyson Waters, a French translator whose authors include:  Vassilis Alexakis, Daniel Arasse, René Belletto, Emmanuel Bove, Eric Chevillard, Albert Cossery, and Yasmina Khadra.  Her translation of Chevillard’s Prehistoric Times won...

Where the Sidewalk Bends: Interview with Adriana Lisboa

A novelist, poet, and short story writer, Adriana Lisboa’s works include the novels Symphony in White (winner of the José Saramago Prize), Crow Blue (named one of the best books of the year by The Independent), and Hanoi (one of O Globo’s best books of the year), the poetry collection Parte da paisagem, and some children’s books. She has had her books published in more than fifteen countries. Lisboa studied music and literature, and has worked as a musician,...

Where the Sidewalk Bends: Translation History in the Capital of the Future

The Third Annual Seminar on the History of Translation, organized by University of Brasília professor Germana Pereira, took place from October 6-8 on the UnB campus, inside a moat-rimmed, mushroom-shaped silver building. The speakers included graduate students and professors from Brazil, the US, Canada, Germany, Belgium, Colombia, and England, translating into or out of Portuguese, English, Spanish, French, Japanese, and German. Flyers on campus warned of scorpion sightings. At...

Interview with Liana Finck

I first encountered Liana Finck’s transportive artwork on the stylized covers of New Vessel Press’s translated books. Soon thereafter, Finck, a graduate of Cooper Union and recipient of a Fulbright Fellowship and a Six Points Fellowship for Emerging Jewish Artists, released her own first book: A Bintel Brief.  Her work has also been featured in The New Yorker, The Forward, Lilith, Tablet, and Slate. I caught up with the up-and-coming artist and writer via Skype, New York...

Where the Sidewalk Bends: In Search of Manoel de Barros’s Pantanal

It’s an odd sensation to arrive in a place that you’ve never been before, but that you’ve already experienced through someone else’s eyes. Especially when that other person is a poet. I first learned about the Pantanal—vast wetlands in central Brazil that seep over the border into Bolivia and Paraguay—through the poetry of Manoel de Barros. Barros was born in Cuiabá, the capital of Mato Grosso state, in 1916. A lawyer and ranch owner by profession,...

Where the Sidewalk Bends: Interview with Sylvio Fraga

Sylvio Fraga was born in Rio de Janeiro in 1986, moved back and forth between the US and Brazil until the age of thirteen, spent his teen years in Rio, earned a BA in Economics at the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), directed the Antônia Parreiras Museum in Niterói, then went to NYC for his MFA in Poetry at NYU, and now lives in Rio again, where he mainly writes music and poetry. So far he has published a collection of poems, Among Trees...

Where the Sidewalk Bends: Why You Don’t Want Rice and Beans in Your Match

“Ele está jogando feijão com arroz!” muttered the Brazilian sitting next to me during the slow-moving match against Mexico, which stalled at 0-0. The player he was exasperated with for “playing rice and beans” was just going through the motions, lacking the energy, creativity, and improvisation that Brazilian footballers are famous for. Costly and divisive as the run-up to the World Cup was, now that it’s here, Brazilians are vibrando for their...

Where the Sidewalk Bends: Interview with Larissa Min

The adventurous, globe-trotting Larissa Min is currently at work on two ambitious writing projects: an account of her family’s double migration from Korea to Brazil to the US, called Breaking English, and a hybrid fiction/creative nonfiction book called Wondering Gondwana that interweaves narratives of Antarctica and the Amazon, the last wild places on earth. A professional writer who has been honored with fellowships from organizations including the Fulbright Foundation,...

Where the Sidewalk Bends: Romeo and Juliet in the Dessert Aisle

Like a Portuguese baker preparing creamy pastéis de nata, to write this post I need to start with eggs. Yolks, to be specific. During the Colonial period, Portuguese convents and monasteries used the whites (clara) for starching clothes in their laundries, while the yolks (gema) were simply thrown out or fed to the pigs. At the time, Portugal was one of the world’s biggest egg producers, so surplus yolk, paired with an influx of sugar from its colonies, became the most...

Where the Sidewalk Bends: Interview with Paulo Henriques Britto

The title of Paulo Henriques Britto’s most recent poetry collection, Formas do nada (Forms of Nothing), should tip you off to the kind of writer he is—concise yet expansive, simultaneously straightforward and existential. His smart, playful poems, usually written in Portuguese but occasionally written in English, have titles like “Cinco sonetos frívolos” (“Five Frivolous Sonnets”), “Duas fábulas sem moral” (“Two Fables...

Where the Sidewalk Bends: Interview with Luciana Hidalgo

It should come as no surprise that walking and yoga—one of which propels her outside, letting her feet and thoughts wander her current city, the other which forces her to slow down, turn inward, and put her “constant circulation of ideas” on hold—are of equal importance to Luciana Hidalgo’s creative process. The Brazilian writer, journalist, and essayist frequently explores opposing forces in her work.  A two-time winner of Brazil’s most prestigious...

Where the Sidewalk Bends: Interview with Pacha Urbano

Brazilian writer, illustrator, and screenwriter Pacha Urbano describes his brain as “an ideas factory that never stops.” His genre-defying projects include the aphoristic book Livro Ao Acaso (Book of Serendipity), the comic strip Filho do Freud (Freud’s Son), a compilation of that series called As TRAUMÁTICAS Aventuras do Filho do Freud (The TRAUMATIC Adventures of Freud’s Son), and, most recently, a book of short stories, Vidas Despercebidas (Unnoticed...

Where the Sidewalk Bends: Carnaval Edition

At the Carnaval blocos (street parties) in Rio last week—rising above the sea of fluorescent wigs, animal ears, and sequined fedoras—I saw the same three signs reappear: Não Vai Ter Copa (There Won’t Be A World Cup), Tá Tudo Caro (Everything’s Expensive), and, inspired by the Occupy Wall Street protests, Ocupa Carnaval.   Near the end of one show in Praça São Salvador, the brass band that was performing passed out an Ocupa...

The Week in Translation

GO what: 2012 PEN Literary Awards Ceremony when: Tuesday, October 23, 6:30pm where: Proshansky Auditorium, The City University of New York more info: http://ow.ly/eEu3U what: The Bridge: Passageways Launch Party with WWB contributors Naja Marie Aidt, Erica Mena, and Rachel Morgenstern-Clarren. when: Wednesday, October 24, 7pm where: McNally Jackson Bookstore, New York, NY more info: http://ow.ly/eEumL what: 15-stop book tour for poets Ghassan Zaqtan and Fady...
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