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Articles tagged "Rio De Janeiro"

Where the Sidewalk Bends: One Year Later

At the tail end of my nine months in Rio de Janeiro last year, after first living in centrally located Laranjeiras followed by a brief stint beachside in Copacabana, I decided I need a change of scenery if I was going to make any real progress on my project: researching and translating contemporary Brazilian poetry with a strong sense of place. A friend spotted an ad for a house along the iconic bonde (tram) line, in the old bohemian neighborhood of Santa Teresa. As I followed the tracks...

Words without Borders Conversations: Clarice Lispector with Benjamin Moser & Edgard Telles Ribeiro

Recently, New Directions released Clarice Lispector's The Complete Stories (reviewed here in the New York Times), translated by Katrina Dodson and edited by Benjamin Moser. During Moser's recent stop through New York, Words without Borders editor Eric M. B. Becker sat down with Moser and Brazilian writer Edgard Telles Ribeiro—whose mother was a close friend of Lispector—to discuss the writer who has been described as the Brazilian Virginia Woolf and the greatest Jewish...

Where the Sidewalk Bends: Interview with Sylvio Fraga

Sylvio Fraga was born in Rio de Janeiro in 1986, moved back and forth between the US and Brazil until the age of thirteen, spent his teen years in Rio, earned a BA in Economics at the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), directed the Antônia Parreiras Museum in Niterói, then went to NYC for his MFA in Poetry at NYU, and now lives in Rio again, where he mainly writes music and poetry. So far he has published a collection of poems, Among Trees...

Where the Sidewalk Bends: Why You Don’t Want Rice and Beans in Your Match

“Ele está jogando feijão com arroz!” muttered the Brazilian sitting next to me during the slow-moving match against Mexico, which stalled at 0-0. The player he was exasperated with for “playing rice and beans” was just going through the motions, lacking the energy, creativity, and improvisation that Brazilian footballers are famous for. Costly and divisive as the run-up to the World Cup was, now that it’s here, Brazilians are vibrando for their...

Where the Sidewalk Bends: Notes from a Poet in Rio

Shortly after sundown on February 2nd, I boarded a snow-covered Boeing 777 in New York City, my bags stuffed to just under the weight limit with clothes and books, and landed the following morning on a palm tree-lined tarmac in São Paulo. It’s been eight years since I last passed through customs in the Guarulhos International Airport en route to the coast—a semester abroad in Salvador da Bahia when I was 21—and much has changed in those intervening years. On the...

1808

How a mad queen, a fearful prince, and a corrupt court deceived Napoleon and changed the history of Portugal and Brazil forever At the end of the summer of 1808, exactly 200 years ago, an unusual event took place as the inhabitants of Rio de Janeiro looked on incredulously. Early in the afternoon on March 7, a naval squadron carrying the crown prince of Portugal, Dom João, and the Portuguese Royal family sailed into Guanabara Bay, fleeing French Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte's...

from “City in Crimson Cloak”

March marks the end of the long dry season in Rio. It's the month when the tropical rains begin, rains that persist for days, nights,weeks. A huge army clad in black suddenly spreads over the horizon; it approaches at a gallop, full speed, and attacks just like that, without warning. It descends upon the city like an abominable, inescapable fate, without even allowing time to pull down the shutters. A furious, savage, vengeful, insufferable, merciless downpour . . . The sky finally...

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