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Articles tagged "Swedish"

Bret Easton Ellis and Other Dogs

After a week or two there was no avoiding the fact that Paco Parra wanted Muriel all to himself. That was why he recommended a different beach to me, a beach that lay a bit further away; all you had to do was take the bus to the next village. Muriel shrugged her shoulders and said it was only for a few days, then he had to go off on a job and we would be alone again. So each day after breakfast I took the bus for about a kilometer. I had books and magazines with me and there was a bar right...

From “The Memory of a Secret”

What do we know about our parents? They’re never anything but parents. They do what parents do, listen but never speak. Help you up but they themselves stay down. One day you’ll start to wonder who they are. Those people who’ve always just been there. You realize that you don’t know what they’re thinking about in their beds at night. You don’t know what they dream about. Your memories don’t provide any answers, they can’t reveal their true...

Tove Jansson’s “The Woman Who Borrowed Memories”

The Finnish writer Tove Jansson is best-known for her dreamy children’s books about a family of trolls. The Moomintrolls (sensible Moomin mama, stargazing Moomin papa, and gentle Moomin boy) have endless adventures and reversals of fortune. Their lives are not always easy—the plots can involve death, bankruptcy, and social alienation. But Jansson’s trolls are so cheery and loving that they make light out of the dark events. The Moomins first appeared in 1945 and are still...

1956

So much of this happened in basements, in thick woolen sweaters, in B major but with strong passages in minor. On the outskirts. That’s where we were from but our thoughts had wings like the pigeons and like them tried to find urban quarters where the life of the spirit was more shaded, fluttering over stone walls heavy with history. The shadow-play of thoughts exposed what words concealed, that no love is as strong as the one that goes unrequited. A gentle drizzle fell...

(“Lengua”: María Zambrano)

The word's dawn is meaning's night I walk in springtime. The wild, strange, violent spring. Birdsong. The beginning of everything, verdure that seems to levitate. Death with a cig in its long holder Chiastic life Aristotle's reason, Parmenides' vision In every word beyond day and night, birth and death this attestation of the unspeakable. A pearl that goes from mouth to mouth. I shall bow down over the dead woman's body there in the...

(“Analogia”)

This poem could be a face Not the right one, but the true one. Analogies deal with relationships that hold. It Speaks. The poem's similarity to the face consists, among other things, in the poet's capacity to see it from inside and struggle to regard it as an outsider. Without ever entirely succeeding. A mirror might be helpful. In Pindar's seventh Nemean Ode he compares song to a mirror. Memory's. The face A sounding mirror. The poem. A mirror of sound....

(“Parousía”)

Our time, why shouldn't I go backward into the moment with my trembling preferences, my restless desire, my thought's uttermost solitude? When I blink I usually see my mother, sitting on the sofa with a book, the gaze from her eyes full of shimmering darkness. Am I filling you up? Maybe you could slap me or kiss me or stick a finger in one of my orifices or in some other way connect yourself to my body. I feel rather like the hand of John of Damascus, cut off...

from “The Moment for Pindar Is a Small Space in Time”

(Analogia) This poem could be a face Not the right one, but the true one. Analogies deal with relationships that hold. It Speaks. The poem's similarity to the face consists, among other things, in the poet's capacity to see it from inside and struggle to regard it as an outsider. Without ever entirely succeeding. A mirror might be helpful. In Pindar's seventh Nemean Ode he compares song to a mirror. Memory's. The face A sounding mirror. The...

The Referee

Fernström would remember later that he had been thinking back to his own playing career while driving through the city that morning. He had felt restless all autumn, but without understanding why. The previous evening, after an early dinner, he told Marjut and Jere that he needed a breath of fresh air, and then he got into the old dark blue Escort, even though he had drunk several glasses of wine with the fish. He had driven from their home in Alppila down to the beach between...

The Book about Blanche and Marie by Per Olov Enquist

In Andrè Brouillet's famous painting of neurologist Jean-Martin Charcot's lecture on female hysteria, a woman is draped over Charcot's assistant's arm. She is placid and completely sensual in the cold room; her dress has fallen from her shoulders and a nurse reaches out to help her as she swoons. This woman is Blanche Wittman, the favorite hysteria patient of Charcot, the head of the women's psychiatric hospital. Brouillet's painting was the only existing...

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