Skip to content

Keywords

Articles tagged "Teaching Translation"

Teaching in Translation: Bennington Translates

From translator Sarah Ponichtera’s presentation on postwar Yiddish poetry and prose. (J.J. Beck for Bennington College.) “All of a sudden, I’m seeing translation everywhere! Gracias! Merci! Toda raba!” I was so thrilled with this exclamation by an undergraduate on the second day of class that I was all but tongue-tied, and so resorted to a bit of mischief: “Oh, but I hope we haven’t arrived at a moment that can’t be translated. I mean,...

WWB Campus: Call for Educators

Are you a teacher of English, world literature, global history, or a related subject? Do you enjoy the literature published in Words without Borders and want to use it in your classroom? Sign up to be part of a new round of pilots for Words Without Borders Campus, WWB's online education initiative. Words Without Borders Campus presents exciting texts from WWB's monthly magazine, organized by country and by theme; alongside each piece of literature are multimedia contextual...

Translation vs. Creative Writing Workshops: Structural Differences

As a track within the MFA Program at Queens College, literary translation tends to follow the pedagogical models of creative writing in poetry, fiction, and drama. Operating on the principle that better writers become better translators, we require translation students to take writing courses in other genres. A verse translator, for example, can opt for a craft class in poetic closure, which will ultimately help his or her renderings into English. Conversely, many of our creative writers...

Translating Heart First: Translation Workshop with Maureen Freely

Among an already special series of Fall Semester events marking the fiftieth anniversary of the Iowa translation MFA, a working workshop session for us current MFA students guest-led by Maureen Freely was a highlight among highlights. A novelist, journalist, translator, activist, professor, and the newest president of English PEN, Freely visited the University of Iowa in late September for a four day residency as an Ida Beam Distinguished Visiting Professor. Established in 1978, these...

Between Love and Justice: Teaching Literary Translation at Boston University

Early in Sonallah Ibrahim’s novel Al-Jalid (Ice), set in Moscow, the Egyptian narrator is taking the metro home from a concert with his beautiful Russian dorm mate Zoya. The train is loud and his Russian is not great, but he gathers that things are not going well with Hans, her handsome East German boyfriend. Zoya makes several remarks that cry out for affection: she always thought she was ugly; her friends used to call her Skeleton; and so forth. His (non)response is...

Stealth Methods: Teaching Translation

I admit it: I’m sneaky when it comes to international literature. I try to sneak translated texts and even just the awareness of language and translation into all of my classes. And why not? Literature comes from all over the world, and if we’re trying to produce well-educated students, it behooves us to make sure they are aware of that. I’m lucky in one sense, in that I’m based in a department that is firmly titled literature, rather than being called English, and...

The Advanced Language Class as Translation Workshop

A wonderful, and perhaps underappreciated, way to bring international literature into the classroom is through transforming advanced language classes into translation workshops. While language classes might seem an obvious home for news from afar, some people associate translation in language classes with a very old-fashioned approach—images conjured of Latin and Greek learned by musty old rote. But the workshop approach has many advantages, including facilitating a deep study of a...

Teaching in Translation: The Translation Workshop

I was hired in 2009 to teach translation in Florida Atlantic University’s MFA program—something that had never been offered in the MFA curriculum. To encourage as many students as possible to register for the translation workshop, I decided that I would not require that they know a second language. Working from the premise that proficiency and flexibility in English were the most important requirements for students in this particular workshop—and that together we would...

Teaching in Translation: Poet as Translator

Editor's note: This essay was delivered at the panel "Teaching Translation in the Workshop," organized by Douglas Unger and with presentations by Jason Grunebaum, Becka McKay, Malena Morling, and Douglas Unger, at the Associated Writing Programs conference, March 2, 2012. Other panelists' presentations will follow. Translation is an art of analogy, the art of finding correspondences. An art of shadows and echoes…  Baudelaire said poetry is essentially analogy. The...

Like what you read? Help WWB bring you the best new writing from around the world.