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Articles tagged "Translation"

7 Ways to Support #Translation Every Day

Image: Bookstore. Creative Commons. In honor of International Translation Day, here are 7 things you can do to support translation every day (plus a list of publishers and journals committed to literature in translation). 1. Read translated books & ask your bookstore or library to stock them. Looking for bookstores dedicated to international lit? Check out Albertine and Idlewild (NYC) or Kinokuniya (NYC, Chicago, San Francisco,...

The City and the Writer: In Valletta, Malta with Nadia Mifsud

Image: Nadia Mifsud. If each city is like a game of chess, the day when I have learned the rules, I shall finally possess my empire, even if I shall never succeed in knowing all the cities it contains. —Italo Calvino, Invisible Cities Can you describe the mood of Valletta as you feel/see it? Baroque is the first word that comes to mind. Valletta is a bustling yet serene city in the daytime; at night, it is amazingly quiet, near-deserted. It is utterly bewitching....

When in Hell, Embrace the Devil: On Recreating “Grande Sertão: Veredas” in English

Image: Passages of Grande Sertão: Veredas hanging in the Museum of the Portuguese Language in São Paulo. (Wikimedia Commons.) Alison Entrekin’s translation of an excerpt from Grande Sertão: Veredas appears in the July 2016 issue of Words without Borders: “Brazil Beyond Rio.” When I was approached about translating a certain Brazilian literary classic renowned for its made-up language and asked if I’d be willing to produce a...

From the Translator: Schernikau’s Quiet Radicalism

Image: From the cover of Ronald M. Schernikau’s Kleinstadtnovelle (Small-town Novella). Lucy Renner Jones’s translation of Ronald M. Schernikau’s “Small-town Novella”​ appears in the June 2016 issue of Words without Borders: “The Queer Issue VII.” It all started with a photograph of a longhaired man with a beard wearing eyeliner. He gazes with an enigmatic smile into the camera and his fingernails look as if they are lacquered...

Translating the Classics: An Interview with Lydia Davis

Image: Lydia Davis at the University of Georgia Chapel (with George Cooke’s 1847 painting, "Interior of St. Peter's"), Wikimedia Commons. In the spring of 2016, as co-teachers of the course Translating the Classics, we and our eight students engaged in an electronic conversation with Lydia Davis, acclaimed author of short stories, collected in volumes like Can’t and Won’t (2014), Varieties of Disturbance (2007), and Break It Down (1986); and translator of...

An Interview with Christina MacSweeney

Christina MacSweeney is a literary translator specializing in Latin American fiction. Her translations include Daniel Saldaña París’s Among Strange Victims (Coffee House Press, 2016), Eduardo Rabasa’s A Zero Sum Game (Deep Vellumn, 2016), and three books by Valeria Luiselli: Sidewalks (Coffee House Press 2014); Faces in the Crowd (Coffee House Press, 2014), which won the Los Angeles Times Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction and was a...

From the Translator: On Translating Yoss and Anabel Enríquez Piñeiro

Image: Wikimedia Commons. Hillary Gulley’s translation of Yoss’s “Interstellar Biochocolate Mousse á la solitaire . . . For Two” and Anabel Enríquez Piñeiro’s “Nothing to Declare” appear in the May 2016 issue of Words without Borders: “On Cuban Time: New Writing from the Island,” which she guest-edited with Esther Allen. Join WWB this Wednesday, March 25 at the...

From the Translator: Fictions of the Cuban Diamond

Image: Cuba vs. Puerto Rico at the 1986 Baseball World Cup. Wikimedia Commons. Dick Cluster’s translation of Eduardo del Llano’s “Swimming Upstream” appears in the May 2016 issue of Words without Borders: On Cuban Time: New Writing from the Island. Eduardo del Llano’s “Swimming Upstream” inhabits a space where the flying feet of speculative fiction cross the cultural touchstone of home plate. Interestingly, while...

WWB at AWP

WWB's panel at AWP: Karen Emmerich and Kareem James Abu-Zeid (top photo); Edward Gauvin, Shabnam Nadiya, and Susan Harris (bottom photo) Last week, WWB was in Los Angeles for the annual Association of Writers and Writing Programs (AWP) conference. Editorial director Susan Harris led a fascinating and engaging panel on “The Translator as Coauthor: Collaborative Translation” with WWB contributors, each of whom discussed their diverse experiences working with authors to...

Q&A with Festival Neue Literatur’s Ross Benjamin

Words without Borders spoke with Festival Neue Literatur curator Ross Benjamin about FNL’s seventh annual celebration of German-language literature from Austria, Germany, and Switzerland, which will take place from February 25–28 in New York City.  Words without Borders: How does Festival Neue Literatur differentiate itself from other literary festivals? Ross Benjamin: FNL is the only US festival to showcase literature originally written in German. At the same time,...

Our Graphic Archive: Issues 2007–16

Click on the graphics below to read our graphic novel issue through the years.   February 2016 - International Graphic Novels: Volume X   February 2015 - International Graphic Novels: Volume IX   February 2014 - International Graphic Novels: Volume VIII   February 2013 - International Graphic Novels: Volume VII   February 2012 - International Graphic Novels: Volume VI   February 2011 - International Graphic Novels: Volume V  ...

WWB Campus: Call for Educators

Are you a teacher of English, world literature, global history, or a related subject? Do you enjoy the literature published in Words without Borders and want to use it in your classroom? Sign up to be part of a new round of pilots for Words Without Borders Campus, WWB's online education initiative. Words Without Borders Campus presents exciting texts from WWB's monthly magazine, organized by country and by theme; alongside each piece of literature are multimedia contextual...

History, War, and Writing: Notes from the Conrad Festival in Krakow

Photo: Thomasz Wiech / the Conrad Festival The first day of my one-week trip to Krakow, during which I planned to learn more about Polish literature by attending the seventh annual Conrad Festival, spending time at the Krakow Book Fair, touring the city, and meeting with authors, agents, translators, and publishers, began with a long red-eye flight from New York City, which was sleepless enough to make everything that day seem fuzzy and slightly surreal. In the early afternoon, I dropped...

Daniel Sada’s “One Out of Two”

Daniel Sada’s One Out of Two is a sleeper agent of a book. It is short enough to read in one sitting, but dense enough to resist such a concentrated attack. And so one reads it, lives with it over the course of a distracted week or so, and gets lulled into a sense of comfort with its singular style—only to be hit with the emotional impact days after finishing the book. It is a brilliant, and welcome, act of literary sabotage. The petite 100-page book tells the simple story of...

International Graphic Novels at New York Comic Con: Brazil and France

On October 8-11, 2015, the Javits Center hosted the tenth edition of the New York Comic Con, gathering a crowd of 170,000 fans, many in costume, eager to meet creators and characters. Among so many masks, tights, and capes, there was also space for international comics, discussed on two panels during the event.   Different is Cool: Gabriel Bá & Fábio Moon The 39-year-old twins from Brazil who write and draw graphic novels—sometimes in collaboration, other...

A Dog’s Life

The dog ran round the corner, his fur shaggy and matted, and stayed there, sheltering from the wind and panting heavily. From a distance it looked as if he was leaning his shoulder against the building, which made him look even more human. He was old and filthy and probably hadn’t eaten for some time, since when I got close he looked straight at me with his light-brown, gummy eyes and started wagging his tail. His whole body wriggled along with that one body part that expresses a...

As It Happened: PEN American Center “Translating Books for Youth” at the Brooklyn Book Festival

At the Brooklyn Book Festival, the PEN Translation Committee brought together three translators and one publisher of international children’s books for a conversation about the importance of bringing books from non-English speaking countries to young readers in the United States. Committee co-chair Alex Zucker moderated the panel that included Claudia Zoe Bedrick, Brooklyn-based publisher of Enchanted Lion Books, and translators Mara Lethem, Julia Heim, and Lyn Miller-Lachmann, chair...

Interview with the Translator: Meg Matich talks to Alison Macomber

Following the Barnard College Translation in Transition conference, Alison Macomber interviewed conference presenter Meg Matich about her translations of Icelandic poetry and translation theory that she’s found useful in practice. Can you tell me a little bit about your current translation project(s)? I think a little background info on my project would be useful here. I currently work primarily with Magnús Sigurðsson, a highly accomplished, young Icelandic poet. His work...

Translation in Transition at Barnard College: Highlights from Day 2

The Translation in Transition conference held at Columbia University’s Barnard College in May featured nineteen panelists and three round table participants from colleges and universities across the country. Organized collectively by the Center for Translation Studies at Barnard College, Mary Grace Alabese of Columbia University, Heather Cleary of Whitman College, and Bret Maney of the University of Pennsylvania, Translation in Transition sought to answer certain questions regarding...

Translation in Transition at Barnard College: Frontiers and Futures of Translation

Even newer than translation studies is one of its emerging arms and its more-likely-than-not future: the machine in translation. How will and how is the digital age changing the act of translation? All of the presenters at "Frontiers and Futures of Translation: The Machine Age, the Age of the Digital Humanities," part of Barnard College’s fifth annual translation conference, were preoccupied with the machine in translation in some way. Notably, every presenter articulated that...

2015 Man Booker International Prize Questionnaire: Ibrahim al-Koni

Born in 1948 in Ghadames Oasis, Ibrahim al-Koni was brought up on the tradition of the Tuaregs, popularly known as "the veiled men" or "the blue men." Mythological elements, spiritual quest, and existential questions mingle in the writings of al-Koni, who has been hailed as magical realist, Sufi fabulist, and poetic novelist. Words without Borders: For those who will read you in the English translation, what advice would you give? Ibrahim al-Koni: I advise my English...

2015 Man Booker International Prize Questionnaire: Marilyn Booth

Marilyn Booth is the Khalid bin Abdullah Al Saud Professor of the Study of the Contemporary Arab World at the University of Oxford, and a Governing Body Fellow at Magdalen College, Oxford. In 2014-15 she was Senior Humanities Research Fellow at New York University Abu Dhabi, and prior to that held the Iraq Chair in Arabic and Islamic Studies at the University of Edinburgh. Her most recent book is Classes of Ladies of Cloistered Spaces: Writing Feminist History through Biography in...

WWB Announces its May 2015 Issue Dedicated to New Palestinian Writing

Contact: Susan Harris Organization Name: Words without Borders Telephone Number: 773-478-9733 Email Address: [email protected] Web site Address: www.wordswithoutborders.org New York City, New York, May 2014, 2015—Words without Borders, the online magazine for international literature, announces the release of its May issue: “New Palestinian Writing.” The eight writers in this issue, selected and presented by playwright, poet, and scholar Nathalie Handal, hail...

Han Kang’s “The Vegetarian”

There is a primal side in each of us, one that disrespects social norms, has needs, makes demands. In her remarkable novel, The Vegetarian, South Korean writer Han Kang explores the irreconcilable conflict between our two selves: one greedy, primitive; the other accountable to family and society.  “Existence precedes essence” is a central tenet of Jean-Paul Sartre’s philosophy—first a human exists and then she creates her essence, the values and meanings that...

Around the Globe: An Introduction to International YA Writing

If you can get past the thick fog of casual snobbery that always seems to envelop this subject, it seems perfectly obvious that a lot of the most interesting writing happening in the English-speaking world just now is being published as YA (young adult) fiction. Obvious, at least, to those who actually bother to read it, rather than those who don’t but still comment on how it is all, necessarily, unsophisticated, derivative, and shallow. Yes, of course there's some bad YA writing...

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