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Graphic Lit

from the February 2012 issue: International Graphic Novels: Volume VI

from “The Eternonaut,” Part II

Read Part I here
from “The Eternonaut,” Part II
from “The Eternonaut,” Part II
from “The Eternonaut,” Part II
from “The Eternonaut,” Part II
from “The Eternonaut,” Part II
from “The Eternonaut,” Part II
from “The Eternonaut,” Part II
from “The Eternonaut,” Part II
from “The Eternonaut,” Part II
from “The Eternonaut,” Part II
from “The Eternonaut,” Part II
from “The Eternonaut,” Part II
from “The Eternonaut,” Part II
from “The Eternonaut,” Part II

Héctor G. Oesterheld

Héctor Germán Oesterheld (born July 23, 1919; disappeared and presumed dead 1977) was an Argentinian journalist and comics writer. Considered the most important Latin American comic writer, Oesterheld is known for creating characters including Sargent Kirk, Bull Rocket, Ernie Pike, Sherlock Time and Mort Cinder, but without doubt he is best known as the creator of The Eternonaut. Oesterheld worked with the best artists and illustrators of his time, including Alberto Breccia and Francisco Solano Lopez. Oesterheld's work took on increasingly political tones in the 1960s and 1970s, and he, along with his four daughters (two of whom were pregnant at the time), were arrested by the Argentinian military government. There is no information about what happened to them, but they are all presumed dead. The Eternonaut was published in Hora Cero, edited by Oesterheld, in weekly installments beginning in 1957. It is widely considered one of the most important Latin American texts in both science fiction and comics.

Francisco Solano López

Francisco Solano López (1928-2011) was one of the most important Latin American illustrators of his generation. Perhaps best known in the U.S. for his erotic comics, he illustrated a number of edgy, dark works including Deep City (Evaristo, written by Carlos Sampayo). He produced artwork for a number of publishers in Madrid and London after fleeing from Argentina to avoid potential arrest. These works included Galaxus: The Thing from Outer Space, and The Drowned World. His range of subject matter, and distinctive illustrating style, has earned him international renown as one of the most inventive illustrators in Latin America. He died in August 2011 from a cerebral hemorrhage.


Translated from Spanish by Erica Mena

Erica Mena is a poet, translator, and editor, not necessarily in that order. She holds an MFA in Literary Translation from the University of Iowa, and is an MFA candidate in poetry from Brown. Her original poetry has appeared in Vanitas, the Dos Passos Review, Pressed Wafer, and Arrowsmith Press. Her translations have appeared in Two Lines, Asymptote, PEN America, and Words without Borders, among others. She is the founding editor of Anomalous Press.

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