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Graphic Lit

from the February 2011 issue: International Graphic Novels: Volume V

The Cat’s Coming (in a Left-Handed Version)

The adaptation that follows was inspired by a short story (also in this month's issue), “Davin Chan Moves Out," by the celebrated Hong Kong novelist and essayist Xi Xi. Chihoi’s version, which was originally published in Chinese in a two-volume collection of graphic adaptations entitled Hijacking (2005), departs in some rather interesting ways from the original story; for example, he makes the central character a comic book artist. In contrast to his usual working practice, Chihoi, who is right-handed, drew this comic with his left hand. The idea came to him after he learned that the now seventy-two-year-old author, who had never learned to type and has always handwritten her stories, lost the use of her writing hand during a recent bout with breast cancer. The serial murders alluded to in Chihoi’s version and graphically described in the original story are based on fact. Only the number of victims and a few details of the killer’s modus operandi were changed.
The Cat’s Coming (in a Left-Handed Version)
The Cat’s Coming (in a Left-Handed Version)
The Cat’s Coming (in a Left-Handed Version)
The Cat’s Coming (in a Left-Handed Version)
The Cat’s Coming (in a Left-Handed Version)
The Cat’s Coming (in a Left-Handed Version)
Translation of "Zuopiezi manhuazhi mao laile." Copyright Chihoi 2005. By arrangement with the author and Joint Publications. Translation copyright 2011 by Steve Bradbury. All rights reserved.

Fiction

Chihoi

Chihoi is a young Hong Kong artist and writer whose graphic fiction has been showcased at the Bilbolbul Festival in Bologna, the Festival BD à Bastia in Corsica, and the “China Comix Now” exhibition at the London College of Communication. His graphic novel Train (Taipei, 2007), a stunning adaptation of a Kafkaesque story by poet and filmmaker Hung Hung, has been translated into French and Italian.


Translated from Chinese by Steve Bradbury

Steve Bradbury's translation of Hsia Yu's Salsa (Zephyr Press, 2014) was shortlisted for the Lucien Stryk Prize. He lives in Ft. White, Florida, near the headsprings of the Ichetucknee River.

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