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September 2012

Writing from the Silk Road

Image: Cai Guo-Qiang, Cai Guo-Qiang Installation view of Endless, Mathaf: Arab Museum of Modern Art, Doha, Qatar, 2011 Photo by Hiro Ihara, courtesy Cai Studio

This month we celebrate literature from along the Silk Road in an issue that features work from Central Asia, Georgia, and China. Noted Uzbek writer in exile Hamid Ismailov paints a picture of mid day in Samarkand, while from Kyrgyzstan Konstantin Kondratenko describes a visit from an unusual winter guest and Alla Pyatibratova reports from the front row of a revolution. Kazakh writer Ilya Odegov's protagonist takes some advice too close to heart while his compatriot, Debut Prize finalist Aigerim Tazhi, sketches a city waiting for salvation. Georgian writer Shota Iatashvili describes a staring match with a chess Grandmaster, and Uyghur poet Exmetjan Osman watches the ages pass by in a city park. Also this month, we feature new work translated from German: Herta Müller writing about a memory of snow, and Finn-Ole Heinrich, who finds that disability is no joking matter. 

Book Reviews

Recent Issues

Modernization and Its Discontents: Contemporary Thai Writing

In Those Days and These: Multilingual Singapore

There Is No Map: The New Italian(s)

Turning Points: Women Writers from Taiwan

Brazil Beyond Rio

The Queer Issue VII

On Cuban Time: New Writing from the Island

Women Write War

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