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International Graphic Novels: Volume XIV

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WWB Daily

February 24th, 2020

The City and the Writer: In Amman with Amjad Nasser (1955–2019)

by Nathalie Handal

If each city is like a game of chess, the day when I have learned the rules, I shall finally possess my empire, even if I shall never succeed in knowing all the cities it contains. —Italo…read more

February 20th, 2020

Utopia and Dystopia in Beirut: A Conversation with Barrack Rima

by Alexandra Gueydan-Turek by Carla Calargé

An excerpt from Barrack Rima's graphic novel Beirut Trilogy appears in WWB's current issue of graphic literature in translation. In conversation with translators Alexandra…read more

February 18th, 2020

Literary Pseudoscience and a New Generation of Argentine Writers: An Interview with Roque Larraquy

by Susannah Greenblatt

When I bought my copy of Comemadre by Argentine novelist Roque Larraquy, the bookseller looked up at me from behind the cash register and said, “Be prepared—this book blew my…read more

February 14th, 2020

7 Stories of Love’s Labors and Loss to Read This Valentine’s Day

by Alexandra Vail

It’s February, and love is in the air. Just in time for Valentine’s Day, we’ve gathered seven stories from our archives that are sure to put your romantic notions to the…read more

February 12th, 2020

First Read—From “Second Sister”

by Chan Ho-Kei

In Chan Ho-Kei's Second Sister, translated by Jeremy Tiang and out next week with Grove Atlantic, a young woman named Nga-Yee tries to uncover the motives behind her sister's suicide. In…read more

February 10th, 2020

The City and the Writer: In Rome with Peter Covino

by Nathalie Handal

If each city is like a game of chess, the day when I have learned the rules, I shall finally possess my empire, even if I shall never succeed in knowing all the cities it contains.…read more


Book Reviews

Rodaan Al Galidi Gives a Mordant Account of a Long Wait for Asylum in “Two Blankets, Three Sheets”

Reviewed by Matt Hanson

At once funny and bleak, this novel by the Iraq-born Dutch novelist draws on his personal experiences to expose the cruel and often absurd procedural challenges that immigrants must endure.

A Balkan Road Trip Leads to a Reckoning with the Past in Olja Savičević‘s “Singer in the Night”

Reviewed by Hannah Weber

A successful soap-opera writer struggling with memory loss sets off on a quest to find her vanished first husband in this new book by the Croatian novelist, poet, and playwright.

Zeruya Shalev Connects Private Woes with Political Strife in “Pain”

Reviewed by Yael Halevi-Wise

The trauma of a terrorist attack and the disillusion of unrequited love haunt the protagonist of a new novel by the Israeli author, in whose work the past usually returns to impinge upon the present, clamoring for repair.

“Space Invaders,” by Nona Fernández, Looks Back at the Unspoken Terrors of Pinochet’s Chile

Reviewed by Ignacio M. Sánchez Prado

A remarkable novel about the traces left by the Chilean dictatorship in the lives of children explores the tension between the unsaid and shreds of remembrance that acquire outsize importance when the reader connects the dots.

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