Skip to content
Forbes names WWB one of the ten best ways to spend your quarantine. Read about it here.

from the July 2018 issue

Read more from the July 2018 issue
from the April 2020 issue

Reviewed by Ignacio M. Sánchez Prado

A murder mystery, told through the thoughts and voices of the inhabitants of a small town in Veracruz, lays bare the shattered hopes of a community hit by rampant violence and economic austerity, as Melchor draws on disparate traditions (from crime fiction to García Márquez novels) to create a masterpiece that is very much her own.

When it was originally released in Spanish in 2017, Fernanda Melchor’s Temporada de huracanes (Hurricane Season) quickly became the Mexican novel of the year. Critics praised the book’s forceful prose and compelling narrative, noting how Melchor masterfully taps into disparate literary traditions—among them, noir detective novels and modernist psychological prose—to create something very much her own.

Prior to the release of the novel, Melchor was already considered a rising star. Her first book, Aquí no es Miami (This is not Miami, 2013), collected various nonfictional pieces on politics and violence in her native state of Veracruz, earning her a place in the revered tradition of crónicas, a major genre in Mexican culture combining journalism, indirect narrative styles, and essayism, popularized by writers like Carlos Monsiváis and Elena Poniatowska. Shortly after, her first novel, Falsa liebre (False hare, 2013), secured her stature as one of the most interesting young writers in the country, showcasing both her unflinching style and the tropes that dominate her work: violence, the dark side of traditional masculinity, and the oppressiveness of life in Mexico’s tropical regions.

Melchor’s origins in Mexico’s Veracruz state, which runs along the Gulf of Mexico, are central to her work. Born in the city of Boca del Río, right next to Mexico’s most important trade port since colonial times, Melchor’s development as a writer has run parallel to the quick progression of the state into one of the most intense sites of violence and political corruption in the country. In her fiction and her nonfiction, Melchor explores the social, cultural, and economic processes that underlie the contemporary history of Veracruz.

Hurricane Season spectacularly fulfills the promise of Melchor’s early works, marking a major leap in her development as a writer. The novel revolves around the murder of a character known as the Witch and the discovery of her corpse by a group of children. The Witch’s identity and her murder provide a compelling narrative that would in itself sustain a very good noir tale, including a major twist that readers will find fascinating. The novel does not follow a linear narrative structure but rather meanders through the minds of various characters, and through different historical moments of importance to the local community.

Melchor uses this narrative kernel to build a complex architecture more widely focused on the life of a town in Veracruz called La Matosa. Some reviewers have noted that La Matosa should be taken as a fictional place, thus aligning the book with the long Latin American tradition of building mythical cities—from Juan Rulfo’s Comala and Elena Garro’s El Porvenir to García Márquez’s Macondo and even Roberto Bolaño’s Santa Teresa. However, La Matosa is indeed the name of a small town in Veracruz. It is named after Francisco de la Matosa, an Angolan slave leader who participated in the early seventeenth-century rebellion that established a community of freed African slaves in the region.

Regardless of how fictional we consider Melchor’s La Matosa to be, Veracruz’s history and the continued marginalization of its rural inhabitants, from colonial times to the present, act as a backdrop for the narrative. As the novel progresses, La Matosa becomes a symbol of Mexico’s failed modernization. Hurricane Season uses the Witch’s murder in part as a departure point to trace the history of violence in Veracruz and Mexico in the late twentieth century. At several junctures, the novel takes us back to late 1970s, when Mexico discovered major oil reserves initially hailed as a fast route to prosperity, giving rise to hopes that were quickly cut short by the price shock of 1982. La Matosa represents the type of peripheral community that would have played a secondary role in Mexico’s oil-fueled development projects. It grows by creating a buoyant but precarious parallel market of brothels and bars that quickly falls victim to neoliberal austerity policies, economic crisis, and the rise of the drug trade. The novel unfolds as an enactment of the collective memory of this community—an act of social remembrance rather than individual recollection. In Hurricane Season, the characters are more compelling in their whole than in themselves.

Hurricane Season is, in literary terms, a unique book in Mexican literature, at least among those translated and published in the US. Contemporary writers like Valeria Luiselli, Verónica Gerber Bicecci, and Cristina Rivera Garza, to name a few, have staked their reputations on different forms of experimentation in fiction, and their works break significantly with twentieth-century traditions of Mexican and Latin American writing by venturing into forms of autofictional and experimental writing much different from the works of the pre-Bolaño canon. In contrast, Melchor updates a significant genealogy of twentieth-century fictional writing that is not so directly engaged by any other influential Mexican writer of her generation.

In an acknowledgment page in the Mexican edition (missing in the US translation), Melchor thanks editor and writer Martín Solares for recommending that she read The Autumn of the Patriarch. Melchor’s prose style clearly harks back to García Márquez’s great 1975 novel in the way its chapters are composed of long, single-paragraphed streams of consciousness. But Melchor also introduces a significant split within this tradition: whereas García Márquez’s prose trends towards the baroque, narrating by aggregation, Melchor’s prose is violent, tearing through the very elements that are brought together in its large chunks of thought. García Márquez skillfully constructs a lavish fictional reality, overflowing with elaborate details. Melchor presents a ravaged one, delivered in a raging voice.

Another element from García Márquez (himself a practitioner of the crónica genre) that seems decisive for Melchor is the idea of the novel as an enactment and performance of collective memory, rather than individual subjectivity. This was a feature of his short novel Chronicle of a Death Foretold, which finds new life in Melchor. Her characters weave together a communal memory that is no longer just unreliable, as it was in García Márquez, but also broken, subject to the fragmentation caused by years of violence and precarity.

Melchor’s writing in Spanish showcases great grammatical and stylistic complexity, populated with regionalisms and subtle variations in narrative voice. Hurricane Season owes a significant part of its success and power to its form, and, as such, its translation into English was a tall order for Sophie Hughes. One of the most accomplished translators of Spanish-language fiction into English, Hughes has become a central figure thanks to her translations of authors like José Revueltas, Alia Trabucco Zerán, and Laia Jufresa, all of them distinct in their literary difficulty, and impeccably rendered into English. Although the translation loses some of Melchor’s linguistic richness, Hughes succeeds splendidly in conveying the flow and, more crucially, the immense power, of the narrative. Other than a few occasional words, Hughes resists the temptation to pepper the book with untranslated Spanish terms, and rather delivers them into her own inventive English nicknames and turns of phrase, which allows the book to be as powerful and as readable as the Spanish original.

At the moment of this writing, Hurricane Season has already picked up various major accolades beyond the Spanish-speaking world, including the Anna Seghers-Preis and the Internationaler Literaturpreis, both granted to the German translation. In English, the book was just shortlisted for the International Booker Prize (which will be awarded in May 19). Just like its Spanish version, Hurricane Season is well on the way to becoming a book of the year in English and in other languages. This is much-deserved recognition for a formidable and mighty novel, a masterpiece of Mexican literature.

from the April 2020 issue

Read more from the April 2020 issue

from the April 2020 issue

Read more from the April 2020 issue
from the April 2020 issue

Read more from the April 2020 issue
from the April 2020 issue

Read more from the April 2020 issue
from the April 2020 issue

Read more from the April 2020 issue
from the April 2020 issue

Read more from the April 2020 issue
from the April 2020 issue

Read more from the April 2020 issue
from the April 2020 issue

Read more from the April 2020 issue
from the April 2020 issue

Read more from the April 2020 issue

from the March 2020 issue

Read more from the March 2020 issue
from the March 2020 issue

Read more from the March 2020 issue

from the March 2020 issue

Reviewed by Rochelle Goldberg Ruthchild

A volume of interviews with survivors of the detention camps first created by Lenin in 1918 documents harrowing abuses against dissidents and minorities that extend to present-day Russia.

They led you away at dawn. So begins the section of Anna Akhmatova’s iconic poem “Requiem,” which Monika Zgustova chose as the frontispiece for this immensely powerful book about women’s experiences in the Soviet gulag.

Zgustova was a teenager in the mid-1970s, when her family fled Czechoslovakia to escape political persecution from the Communist regime (her father was a prominent Czech linguist). She grew up in the US. Intensely interested in Russian literature, she moved to Barcelona, where she worked as a translator of Russian and Czech literature, especially dissident writings. Traveling to Moscow in September 2008, she met a group of former gulag prisoners, many of them Jewish. Seated around kitchen tables, supposedly out of range of KGB listening devices, they told their stories. As she listened to them, Zgustova realized that the men’s narratives detailed experiences that were generally much better known. She resolved to bring forward the women’s stories. And thus germinated the idea for this book.

Zgustova traveled in Russia and Europe (to London and Paris) to interview female gulag survivors. The gulags, Soviet prison camps, were first established by Lenin in 1918, soon after the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution. From 1930 to 1953, during Stalin’s rule, approximately 18 million people were confined; about 1.7 million of those are estimated to have perished. As Zgustova’s interviews show, however, repression did not stop with Stalin. True, people were no longer arbitrarily shot, but after Stalin’s death in 1953, the murderous terror of his regime was replaced by a police state that never really went away. During the Khrushchev (1953–1964) and Brezhnev years (1964–1982), the KGB and the gulag system kept on, and much of the brutality and indifference persisted. Some camps still exist under Vladimir Putin’s autocratic rule. Imprisoned members of the feminist opposition group Pussy Riot, among others, have documented the abysmal conditions of post-Soviet incarceration.

Those Zgustova interviews tell of unspeakable horrors—the dreaded knock on the door at some ungodly hour; the callous KGB agents rifling through their belongings; the travel to the far north or some other inhospitable climate; the scarce and often repulsive food; the grueling efforts of forced labor: felling trees, moving rocks, digging ditches, repetitive and often meaningless work.

It is hard to believe that these women survived. As Zgustova notes, they live with lasting physical effects of what they were put through. For example, many cannot stand up for long, the result of years of endless lineups, unspeakable deprivation of all kinds, a diet of barely digestible slop, and solitary confinement for months at a time at the whim of those in authority.

The brutal indifference of the guards, the arbitrariness of the administration, all this is recounted. Some women came from the humblest of backgrounds, while others were connected to famous dissidents.

The harassment of Boris Pasternak’s mistress, Olga Ivinskaya, the model for Lara in Doctor Zhivago, is recalled by Ivinskaya’s daughter. Zgustova also interviews Ella Markman, a friend and gulag mate of Marina Tsvetaeva’s daughter Ariadna Efron. Markman recounts the trials and tribulations of the great poet Tsvetaeva, lured back to the Soviet Union in 1939, only to experience her husband Sergei Efron’s death at the hands of Stalin’s secret police and the harassment and imprisonment of her daughter Ariadna. Subjection to a sort of internal exile, privation, and psychological torture led Tsvetaeva to suicide in 1941. Unlike Anna Akhmatova, who was threatened but never imprisoned, remaining in her Leningrad apartment until her death, Tsvetaeva simply could not withstand the loss of loved ones and the pressure put on her after she returned to Stalin’s socialist paradise.

Zgustova shows that Soviet-style repression extended beyond the country’s borders, ensnaring citizens of neighboring states. She interviews Poles who wound up in the gulag and who testify that they saw other foreigners, including Americans, there. All the accounts confirm that guards, camp officials, and criminal prisoners generally demonstrated callousness and random cruelty. The women were often saved by the few compassionate or bribable staff.

The stories also illuminate the broad range of people detained for political reasons by the Soviet dictatorship, from committed communists to deeply orthodox nuns and other religious believers.

This system did not end with the collapse of the Soviet Union. The pattern of late Soviet repression is once again felt in Russia today. The gulags have enjoyed a resurgence with former KGB agent Vladimir Putin’s ascension to power in 2000 and subsequent strengthening of the police state. Some of Zgustova’s interviewees attest to this, recounting repression extending almost to the present.

Natalia Gorbanevskaya’s presents one of the strongest and most harrowing testimonies of this continuing pattern of repression and abuse. She was active in dissident circles in the 1960s as a friend of Akhmatova’s and an editor of the journal Chronicle of Current Events. When the Soviets invaded Czechoslovakia  under Brezhnev’s orders, in August 1968, she and seven friends staged a protest in Moscow and were attacked by KGB operatives. Despite being arrested and physically assaulted, Gorbanevskaya continued her public demonstrations. A year later, she became a victim of a newer KGB tactic. State agents confined her to a mental hospital and forcibly fed her psychotropic drugs. As a result, she suffered severe long-term side effects, including Parkinson’s disease. Still, she didn’t stop protesting. In 1975, she was forced to emigrate to Israel with her two small children. Relocating to Paris, she last traveled to Moscow in 2013 to participate in protests on the forty-fifth anniversary of the Czech invasion. Once again, she was arrested for organizing “an unauthorized demonstration.” Subsequently released, she returned to Paris, where she died three months later.

No one work can provide a full picture of a system that dates to the early days of Lenin’s Bolshevik rule. One topic on which Zgustova’s informants are silent is same-sex relations among the political prisoners. Lesbianism is only mentioned once, in a list of deviants whom the interviewees encounter on their journey through the gulag system. Either Zgustova didn’t ask or she and her interviewees shared a common desire to keep this topic in the closet. In this they share the general silence and/or negative attitudes of current Russian society, very much part of Putin’s so-called “traditional values” agenda. Yet historians like Laura Engelstein and Dan Healey have shown that pre- and immediately post-1917 Russian “traditional values” included a greater acceptance of homosexuality than did Western societies at that time.

This omission aside, Zgustova has followed in the footsteps of Nobel Prize winner Svetlana Alexievich in seeking out and documenting the too often invisible stories of women’s experiences in the gulag. She has made a significant contribution to our understanding of women’s experiences of repression in the Soviet Union and in the post-Soviet space.

from the March 2020 issue

Read more from the March 2020 issue
from the March 2020 issue

حشرجة الموس وبدايات الترويض

 

حشرجة الموس وبدايات الترويض[1]

 

لم يمضي الحال كما اشتهت مراكب طفولتي، حرة وطليقة العب مع الاولاد في الشارع ويحلو اللهو حين تمطر المساء، بدأ الترويض يوم سمعتهن يحكن:

البنات كبرن وبقن على (الطهور) غنت بنت الجيران التي تكبرني بصوت محشرج: (الليلة الفرحة وبكرة الضبحة)، ولم اعرف ما تعنى الا لاحقا.

الطهور... الرمل كما الماء كما الحجر صالحا للوضوء لتصلى الروح خلاصها

وجسد صغير غض كقصب السكر في ذاكرة الفقراء.

وكان بداية شتاء

كان الشتاء الذي ختمت فيه تلاوة الفقد والغيابات

لم يتبقى كثيرا لألج المدرسة، كنت فرحة بها وسلكت الدرب نحوها ومشطته بلهفتي ورغباتي في التعّلم وسطوة الارادة.

فرحتي وشقيقتي الاصغر حين وضعنا الجميع موضع احتفاء وكأننا مركز الكون وتلك الطفلة تعنى ان هذه الفرحة ستتبعها ذبحة لعصافيرنا، يوم بدأ شلال الاسئلة، اسئلة الكينونة.

كيف لأمي، كيف لأمي حليمة ان تحتفى بألمى؟

كيف لأمهاتي وخالاتي ان يحتفن برائحة دم طفولتي؟ كيف فعلت حبوبتي ريا ولم تسمع نشيج الشامة التي ترقد على انفها وهي تهمس لها: ان هذه (العنبة) التي اقتطعوها من نبته طفولتي لا تختلف كثيرا عن شامتها الشقية على انفها الذي يشبه منقار الحدأة!!

كيف لهن وهن تألمن كثيرا، ام انه استمراء الالم؟

صوت الحبوبة يزجرنا:

هن الجدات هكذا دائماً ماطرات بالمحنة وفاتحات لأبواب الرحمة وأيضاً فاتحات لأفخاذ الصغيرات لتلك المرأة ذات الشنطة الحديدية التي تراصت فيها مشارط مختلفة لقص الحلم الإنساني في اللوعة والصبابة.

الحبوبة التي بدأت لي بوجه لم تألفه خيالاتي وهي تحكى لنا القصص والاساطير عن الغول، كيف هي نفسها تأمر (الغولة) بأن تجزر مدخل الخصوبة حين يشتهى المطر جزر دعوات النساء، فتقص بذلك مد القلب لطفلةٍ ستتمدد لاحقاً كل أنسٍ دون أن تجلجل روحها بالفرح أو تقدر على عزف موسيقى جسدها كما تشتهي.

حشرجة الموس، لهفة المشرط الغائص في لحمى الغض، فيما صوت المرأة ذات الصوت الأجش لا زال يزمجر:

- ما تخلي حاجة فيها، (اللالوبة) دي فيها رجس الجن!! ثمرة شجرة اللالوب لم يعد طعمها يستهويني ولم أقربها من ذلك اليوم.

المخدر سرى في جسدي الصغير، حاولت رفع رأسي لأعرف ماذا تفعل هذه المرأة، زجرتني التي تمسك يدىّ اليسار بان أغمض عيوني وان لا اسأل كثيرا.

كنت اسمع صوت الطبل يعلو في الخارج، بنات الحلة والنساء يزغردن كلما غاصت الداية في لحمى. عرفت معنى الكلمات التي دندنتها بنت الجيران بصوت محشرج واشبه بالبكاء (الليلة الفرحة وبكرة الضبحة). لسبب ما كنت أحس بالخوف وفى ذهني حمامة تم ذبحها أمامي زمانئيذ، هل سوف اذبح مثلها؟ الحفلة والفساتين الجديدة والحنية من كل اهل البيت نستني مشهد الحمامة المذبوحة وزغبها يهدل بصوت باكي.  

صوت الطبل يعلو، منى شقيقتي الاصغر التي سمعت صرختها المكبوتة قبل ان افك ساقي للريح ويتم القبض علىّ والعودة بي الى حيث السرير المفروش بمشمع من البلاستيك. مشهد المقصات يغلى في الماء التي وضعت على كانون مشع بالجمر. الحقنه المعدة وخمسة نساء شهدن المذبحة , بعد طعني حقنه البنج جاءني صوت بت الجيران خافتا الى ان تلاشى مع تقطيع جزء من البظر وجزء من الشفرين الصغيرين والكبيرين ثم رأيتها تعد ابرة اخرى لتخيط ما قطع منى. رأيتها تقطع جهنمية غضة. رأيت ابتسامتها والتي تمسك رأسي الصغيرة للخلف وكنت اقاوم لأرى ماذا يفعلن بي.

تذكرت ابى وناديته، قالت لي التي تشد ساقي نحو اليمين بان لا رجل هنا.  لا ابى ولا جدي ولا شقيقي الصغير توأم منى التي تقترب سنواتها الى خمس وكنت على وشك السبعة اعوام. كانت فقط نساء ولم ارى ابى الا في اليوم الثاني. 

في المساء مازال الكل مبتهج والاهتمام بمني شقيقتي وبي يزيد مع الوجبات المميزة من شوربة الحمام واللحم المحمرة، على طرف الحائط كان يرقد رأس الخروف فهو من نصيب القابلة, هذه الشخصية المهمة التي يصغى لها الجميع, خرجت محملة بالهدايا من حلوى وسكر وشاي وخبيز ورأس الخروف المسكين الذى كان شاهدا على الالم.

لقد حانت مواعيد السيرة أي الرحلة للبحر وجاء البص المعروف (بابو رجيلة) وتاكسي لأجلنا، نحن بنات الطهور.

سألت أمي حليمة عن تلك البلحة واين قبروها، رأيتها، قرب بالوعة الغسل، رأيتها حزينة، نفحت فيها آهة جبارة فحبلت، حبلت ثمرات طازجات رافقتني نخلاتها في مقبل الايام.

في الليل بدأ النتح، صحت العقارب التي لم يتم ترويضها، لمست بيدي الصغيرة جرحى، تلك الخيوط الحارقة من ترويض عصافيرنا التي كفت ليلتها عن الزقزقة.

رائحة الحناء التي طربت لها طفولتي اختلطت برائحة دمى، المى وصراخي يرتد صداه في اغنيات السيرة

وبحر أبيض وذلك المزار لرجل من رجال الله الصالحين الذي يرقد على ضفاف النيل الابيض يشهد على دمعاتي وآهات طفلتين. بعد ان أطلقوا سراحنا كان هناك وميض قد انفطا ولكن هناك مئة فانوس قد اشتعل في عقلي.

كنا حين نجلس تحت شجرة اللالوب تتحسس كل واحدة منا آهة حمامتها المذبوحة بين فخذيها الصغيرين،

ومع ذلك فالجدات طيبات، يناولن أباريق الوضوء لرجالهن

عرفت لاحقا ان ابى كان ضد الختان وسمعت ان جداتي قالن له ان الامر يخص (النسوان) ولا دخل للرجال فيه وكان لأبى فضل ان يصر  على ان يكون الختان سنة اذا كان لابد منه وخضعن لأمره الا انهن عادن لنا ذات العملية بعد سنوات  لأنهن اكدن بان الداية لم تقلع الشيء من جزوره واقسمت جارتنا انها سمعت ان لبولنا صوت كمن للبنات (الغلقات), لذا وجب اعادة الطهور وان تجز النبتة (الشيطانية) من جزورها ولولا الخوف من ردة فعل ابى لجزن كل شيء ولكن تمت إعادة العملية، وهكذا بدأ الترويض وما عرفوا ان العناد كان وليد الترويض ليمهد الطريق لفرسه تصهل بالحقوق الانسانية بحق النساء في الحياة المعافاة.

 

في العشر الثانية كنت فرحة بتفتح الليمون في جسدي، كنت في حبور أزهو بأثداء الطيور على صدري، تأملتهما بأعجاب وحنو على مرآتنا الصغيرة، رأيتهما طازجتان كتمرات في شهر الصيام. لقد احتفيت بهما كما احتفيت بأول قطرات دم نمطوها قالوا انها خصوبتي... احتفيت بزهرتين جهنميتين فحاصروني الى ان صارتا دومتين لا ينتميان الاّ للخوف الذي تمردت عليه.

واحتفيت بالطمث، كثيرا، كنت اشم رائحته، كان اشبه برائحة المطر على القش. اشبه برائحة المطر والندى على شجرة الليمون.  لم تقل لي أمي شيء عن البلوغ ولكن جدتي التي كنت اناديها بأمي حليمة كانت دائمة السؤال وبفضول كنت اتمرد عليه ايضا بالإجابة حين تسأل: (العادة جاتك).  يومها وكانت (القمرة) في كامل خصوبتها. استدارات ثم اتسعت ثم ضاقت حين داهمني المغص. كل ثمانية وعشرين يوما انتظرها بشوق. شكل خرائطها على فستان البنت التي كانت تجلس جواري في الفصل الخامس جعلها تتوارى خجلا وبعض البنات يشرن لها بغرابة. اظن انهن من البنات اللاتي لم يعرفن بعد كيف تبدو قطرات الدم الحنون.

يوم داهمني الطمث ربطت جدتي (سعفة) غزلتها من جرائد النخل واحجية وكمون اسود

ليحميني العين، فصار الاسود هويتي وكل طقوس أنوثتي.

اذكر ان احتفائي بهاتين النهدين الصغيرين كبيرا، كنت اراقصهما وانا في طريفي الى المدرسة وعودتي الى البيت. في يوم شاهدني ابى وضربني كيلا امشي بطريقة غير التي رآها اذ قال بأني كنت اهز صدري وانا في الطريق ومن يومها تحددت مشيتي ممشوقة وراقصة للحياة.

 

 

 

 

إشراقة مصطفى حامد

 

 

 

[1] فصل من سيرتي الذاتية: أنثى الأنهار، من سيرة الجرح والملح والعزيمة الذي صدر عن دار النسيم بالقاهرة 2015.

 

Read more from the March 2020 issue
from the March 2020 issue

Read more from the March 2020 issue
from the March 2020 issue

Read more from the March 2020 issue
from the March 2020 issue

المولودة

المولودة

رواية نائلة كامل المولودة ماري إلي روزنتال

تأليف نادية كامل

ترجمة بريدي ريان والسيد طه

 

 

الشيوعيين الفرنساويين وهم ماشيين سلموني لخلية شيوعية مصرية والمسؤول عنها وعني كان واحد اسمه عبد الستار الطويلة، عضو في اللجنة المركزية للمنظمة، مش بالانتخاب ومش علشان يستحق، إنما بالتصعيد: يعني لما اتقبض على أعضاء اللجنة المركزية، صعدوا الصف التاني من أعضاء الحزب للقيادة وبقوا هم اللجنة المركزية، ولكن اتقبض على الصف التاني كمان فانتهى الأمر إن واحد زي عبد الستار وعدد من شباب الشيوعيين مسكوا القيادة. أعتقد إني قابلته في بيت واحد اسمه فؤاد بلبع في العباسية، عرفت بعد كدا إن عبد الستار كان مسؤول عن الجهاز الفني، يعني المطبعة، وحطِّني في «جهاز» توزيع المنشورات. كان فيه رغبة من القيادات اللي في السجن إن الجهاز الفني بالذات يستمر، والمنشورات ضروري ضروري بأي شكل لازم تستمر تطلع وتتوزع، علشان يدُّوا إحساس للبوليس وللحكومة إن عدد الشيوعيين كبير وفيه غير المقبوض عليهم أعداد ياما برَّه. بالطريقة دي أنا دخلت تنظيميًّا في خلية لتوزيع المنشورات، والنظام إن حد يديني منشورات ويديني طريقة اتصال مع ناس أنا مش فاكرة ولا أساميهم ولا الأماكن اللي باقابلهم فيها، أفتكر نفسي طشاش وانا باسلم منشورات.

كان المفترض إن انا مش باثير أي شكوك لأن شكلي أجنبية، بيضة شوية وشعري على الموضة: كانت طلعت تسريحة من ممثلة فرنسية اسمها «دومينيك بلانشار» عملت فرانشة يعني قُصَّة منزلة شوية شعر على القورة، عجبتني القُصَّة لإني كنت متعقدة إن قورتي مش واسعة كفاية، على أساس إن القورة الكبيرة تدل على الذكاء والقورة الصغيرة تدل على الغباء. دا غير إن قورتي دوغري مش مدورة. لقيت طريقة الفرانشة أو القُصَّة اللي تنزل لغاية الحواجب، ممكن تنفعني وتخبي قورتي. القورة الواسعة موضة انتشرت من تكوين الممثلات الأمريكانيات، عندهم قورة «bombée» مقورة واسعة وعريضة. في عز النشاط مع الطلاينة، محاضرات وثقافة وكفاح وشيوعية وتحرر وطني وكوليرا، كنت مهتمة باللبس ورحت خدت كورس تفصيل عند «بروفيلي» لمدة شهر، واتعلمت القصَّ وعمايل الباترون وابتديت أفصل لنفسي على الموضة. كنت باحاول ألبس شيك، باحب الهدوم، وأمي كانت بتشجعني طبعًا. الجماعة الشيوعيين هنا قالوا:

- دي حتكون كويسة قوي بعيدة عن كل الشبهات.

أشيل شنطة سوق كبيرة، أحط جواها المنشورات واسلمها لناس معينة في مكان معين. وانا باحكي ابتديت افتكر كان بيحصل ازاي، معظم الأعضاء كانوا لسه طلبة في الثانوية العامة وكانوا محتاجين لدروس لغات، أروح عندهم في البيت أدِّيهم دروس فرنساوي علشان الامتحانات. كان فيه طالب في العباسية كنت باروح أدِّي له درس، تحت اسم إن أنا مدرسة فرنساوي، أسيب عنده المنشورات وانزل بشنطة الخضار فاضية وآخد فلوس الدرس ياخدها مني عبد الستار الطويلة، أنا شغلي كان تطوع للعمل السياسي. كل دا أبويا وأمي ما يعرفوش حاجة، قلت لهم بشكل عام اني بادِّي دروس، ما دقَّقوش.

اتعرفت على أعضاء أول خلية، عايدة أخت إجلال السحيمي، عايدة كانت بتدِّي دروس إنجليزي علشان تعليمها إنجليزي، كانت ساكنة في الزمالك وبَرضُه المفروض إن شكلها البرجوازي ما يثيرش شكوك البوليس. والتالتة كانت اسمها عليَّة، افتكرتها دلوقت وانا باحكي وافتكرت اسمها كمان. عليَّة بنت محمود باشا كانت ساكنة في جاردن سيتي في بيت شيك وعندها مربية فرنسية بتربيها من أيام ما اتولدت. المربية الفرنسية سمتها «آلييت» علشان يبقى اسمها فرنساوي وكانت بتاخدها في الصيف تفسحها في فرنسا، على حساب أبو عليَّة، الباشا، وترجعها مصر بتتكلم فرنساوي مِية في المية، أظن إنها كانت بتدرس في مدرسة «الليسيه». عليَّة عزمتني على الغدا عندهم، تجربة ظريفة، الباشا محمود راجل كبير في السن يقعد على السفرة وأمها ست مصرية تخينة ما تعرفش تقرا عربي، تشبه شوية لمرات النحاس باشا، عندها سفرجي وطباخ، غير الدادة المربية اللي كانت بتقعد معانا على السفرة. عليَّة قالت لهم:

- عايزة اعزم واحدة صاحبتي تتغدى معانا.

فقعدوني على السفرة جنب «آلييت». الأكل بيطبخه الطباخ باستثناء اللحمة، بينما إحنا قاعدين على السفرة بناكل، تقوم المربية في نص الأكل تروح المطبخ تعمل الفيليه أو الأنتركوت «à la minute» - يعني في ساعتها - بإيديها والسفرجي والطباخ واقفين، اللحمة تيجي سخنة من على النار وناكلها في ساعتها والسفرجي يخدِّم علينا.

من الناحية التانية أنا كنت محتاجة لدروس عربي علشان خواجاية ما باتكلمش عربي إلا بسيط وعليَّة تعليم فرنسي نفس الشيء ما تعرفش عربي تقريبًا. عبد الستار الطويلة ييجي عند عليَّة على الساعة تلاتة بعد الغدا على أساس إنه مدرس العربي، لابس بدلة وطربوش. كان عنده خطوة واسعة وشوشة، زرِّ الطربوش يتهز وهو ماشي بطول البيت، والبيت كبير، لحد ما ندخل في الاستوديو يعني المكتب. إدانا فعلًا دروس عربي وكتاب عربي وشوية واجبات، ما دام احنا بنكافح مع الشيوعيين المصريين لازم العربي بتاعنا يكون كويس. أنا و«آلييت» اتصاحبنا أكتر من عايدة السحيمي لإن كنت باشوفها أكتر. «آلييت» حبِّتني لدرجة إني عزمتها على الغدا عندنا في بولاق. قلت لأبويا وأمي إن فيه واحدة صاحبتي عزمتني على الغدا عندها وعايزة اعزمها عندنا. ما اعرفش قلت لهم اتعرفت عليها ازاي، بس إنتِ عارفة إن أبويا وأمي بيحبوا الأكل ويحبوا يطبخوا ومكرونة أمي حلوة، وجت عليَّة اتغدَّت معانا والمرة اللي بعدها جابت دادتها، الست المربية الفرنسية، عايزة تطمن، وانبسطت من جو البيت عندنا. إحنا كنا ساعتها لسه ساكنين في شارع نعيم على فكرة، يعني حتة متواضعة جدًّا. أنا وعليَّة كنا بنعمل المغامرات دي كأننا بنتفسح، نقعد مع بعض نتغدى سوا وناخد وندي دروس ونروح السينما ونوزع منشورات. أقصد أقول إن ما كانش عندنا الإحساس بالخطورة. ما كناش خايفين خالص.

اسم عبد الستار الطويلة الحركي كان «فتحي» وهو من اللي بيسموهم «المحترفين الثوريين»، يعني يسيبوا شغلهم، ويسيبوا بيوتهم وما يتعرفش هم ساكنين فين والمنظمة تصرف عليهم من اشتراكات الأعضاء، مهنته «ثوري» متفرغ، ساب بيته وعايش في حتة مش معروفة يحرس المطبعة وينظمنا. دي بقى كانت مسؤوليته في اللجنة المركزية. الاتصال به كان عن طريق تلفون الشركة اللي باشتغل فيها «جون ديكنسون» لتصدير وتوزيع ورق الكراريس، شركة ورق إنجليزية كبيرة. بعد كام درس عربي، عبد الستار الطويلة بالطربوش، بطَّل ييجي، اختفى أيام وبعدين كلمني في تلفون الشركة وقال لي:

- أنا هربان، جم يقبضوا عليَّ وهربت، حنغير مكان المقابلة، المرة دي نتقابل في شارع قصر النيل، حنكمل شغلنا عادي.

أنا رديت:

- آه طبعًا.

عمارة كبيرة واخدة زاوية شارع قصر النيل وفيها محل كبير يمكن «صيدناوي» أو «داود عدس». عبد الستار أجَّر أوضه من أُوَض السفرجية والطباخين فوق السطوح.

رحت له، الواحد يطلع بالأسانسير لغاية آخر دور وبعدين ياخد سلم الخدامين للسطوح. أوضة عادية. كملنا دروس علشان ضروري أتعلم عربي، وادَّاني اسم حركي، وكتبت اسمي الجديد على كتاب العربي: «فضيلة»، واستمريت أدِّي دروس فرنساوي ولكن لطالب جديد، فين بقى؟ في القلعة، حتة شعبية، واحدة زيي شكلها خواجاية إلى حد كبير تعدي هناك، أكيد ملفتة للنظر ومثيرة للشبهات. كنت باخد الشارع اللي بيطلع على القلعة وبعدين شمال في شارع محمد علي اللي ساكنين فيه عائلات الناس اللي بيرقصوا في الأفراح، الشاب الجديد دا بيته في واحد من الشوارع الجانبية. عيلة الشاب عيلة محترمة، ما حسسونيش بحاجة تضايقني، بيت بسيط، كنبة بسيطة، أبسط من بيت طالب العباسية، بس مش دا المهم، المهم هو إني كنت باجيب له المنشورات في القلعة! أستلم المنشورات واروح شارع محمد علي، أدِّي له الدرس واسيب له المنشورات وانزل اروَّح. أخش عندهم بشنطة مليانة منشورات واطلع بشنطة فاضية، واحط قماش أو خضار أو أي كراكيب علشان ما يبانش إنها فاضية. الشغلانة دي استمرت مدة، لكن عليَّة - «آلييت» - اختفت من حياتي.

نرجع لعبد الستار الطويلة، المسؤول عني وعن عملية الجهاز الفني «المطبعة». كلمني عبد الستار تاني في الشغل:

- ما تجيش الأوضة، قابليني في محطة ترماي باب اللوق، تمشي ورايا كأنك ما تعرفينيش، حاكون لابس جلابية بيضة.

كان لسه فيه ترماي أيامها. وفعلًا رحت لقيته ماشي يبص يمين ويبص شمال بالجنب بشكل مريب، واتأكد إن انا شفته ومشيت وراه، مش عارفة رحنا فين، حكى لي إن البوليس هجم على أوضة السطوح:

- وانا هربت من السلم التاني.

فيه سلِّمين في العمارة:

- خرجت لابس جلابية بيضة افتكروني من الخدامين وما عرفونيش.

ساب الأوضة باللي فيها وهرب، ومن ضمن ما فيها الكتاب والكراسة اللي كنت باتعلم بيهم عربي، ولكن الحمد لله إن على الكراسة والكتاب مكتوب اسمي الحركي «فضيلة» مش اسمي الحقيقي: هي دي بقى فايدة الأسماء الحركية. المقابلات أصبحت بالطريقة دي، يكلمني في الشغل ويديني ميعاد في محطة ترماي أو أتوبيس، أشوفه ويشوفني وما نكلمش بعض، ييجي الأتوبيس يركب هو درجة تانية وانا اركب درجة أولى. ولما ييجي مكان النزول يفوت قدامي لو قاعدة على كرسي أقوم من غير ما نبص لبعض، ينزل وانا انزل وراه، يمشي وانا امشي وراه على مسافة. عبد الستار سكن مع «زميل» عايش مع أمه وانا حسِّيت إنهم بياخدوا منه إيجار. أكيد كانوا مخبيين المطبعة هناك، والزميل دا كل اللي اعرفه عنه إن اسمه الحركي «عبد النبي»، مش فاكرة اسمه الحقيقي. كنا «خلية» أنا وعبد الستار والزميل «عبد النبي».

فاكرة بيت السيدة زينب لأنه كان آخر بيت.

الشغل السياسي كان محصور في كدا: تمويه للبوليس السياسي، وتمويل من خلال دروس الفرنساوي اللي بادِّيها، وتوزيع المنشورات اللي بتتطبع.

طول السنة دي تقريبًا والبوليس بيدوَّر على الجهاز الفني، اللي هو المطبعة، يا اللي انا عمري ما شفتها المطبعة دي! باخد المنشورات اللي بيطبعوها لكن ما اعرفش بيطبعوها إزاي. طباعة رديئة على فكرة. أيامها كنت باعرف عربي قليل، والمنشورات مكتوبة بالعربي طبعًا، كتابة كتير وضيقة. مش مثلًا يطبعوا بحروف كبيرة شعارات أو أفكار محددة، لا، صفحتين تلاتة وكتابة صغيرة وكلام كتير مدبسة من هنا ومن هنا. يلَّا معلش، كانت طريقة بدائية عملية نشر الفكر الشيوعي في المجتمع المصري. أعتقد إن قليلين اللي كانوا بيقعدوا ويقروا المنشور دا من الأول للآخر.

في السنة اللي انا اشتغلت فيها مع عبد الستار غيَّر مكان سكنه تلات مرات. مرة كان عند فؤاد بلبع في العباسية أو في الحدايق مش فاكرة كويس، بعد كدا راح في أوضة الخدم على السطوح، فوق «داود عدس» في شارع قصر النيل، ومرة تالتة في السيدة زينب في بيت «عبد النبي». لو نروح السيدة أوريه لك، ورا الجامع، وانتِ جاية من شارع المبتديان والجامع في وشك الحارة تبقى على يمين الجامع، الواحد يمشي مسافة في الحارة دي وبعدين يدخل في حارة تانية صغيرة يمين وبعدين شمال، بيت شعبي طبعًا في حارة صغيرة ومش ممكن حد يفوت منها إلا من سكان الحتَّة. أكيد من أول مرة أنا رحت خدوا بالهم إن فيه حد «غريب»، تصوَّري إن المفروض بالعكس، المفروض إن المكان دا يكون في منتهى الأمان والسرية والاحتياطات من البوليس.

المشكلة اللي عرضوها عليَّ، عبد الستار وزملاته أحمد الرفاعي وأنور عبد الملك وواحد أظن اسمه لمعي، إن عايزين يأجروا بيت يحطوا فيه المطبعة، بس لازم يكون ساكن فيه اتنين متجوزين عاديين علشان ما يلفتوش نظر البوليس يوافقوا إن بيتهم يبقى «الجهاز الفني»، ما لقوش، ودا المفروض السبب اللي علشانه حصل الجواز بيني وبين عبد الستار الطويلة. سألوني:

- مستعدة تتجوزي؟

وانا كنت مستعدة لكل شيء، كنت في حالة تنويم مغناطيسي، جو من السرية ومن المغامرة والمؤامرة والكفاح ضد البوليس فما كنتش باحسب أي حساب.

- هل شرط علشان تتجوزي إن الشخص دا يكون مسيحي؟

أنا لقيت السؤال غريب شوية، أنا فاهمة إن انا لو حاخش في العمل السري وابقى محترفة، حاسيب الحياة العلنية، حاسيب البيت وحاهرب من عند ابويا وامي، إزاي ممكن في الظروف دي يسألوني مسيحي ومسلم؟ تفرق في إيه؟

قلت لهم:

- لا مش شرط.

وكمان الحقيقة إني ما كنتش واخدة بالي قوي إن المصريين مسيحيين ومسلمين، المصريين مصريين - عرب - الخواجات هم اللي مسيحيين ويهود، آخر لخبطة في دماغي.

قعدوا يفكروا وفي النهاية يظهر ما لقوش طريقة تانية علشان يخبوا المطبعة دي. فجه عبد الستار الطويلة وقال لي:

- عندك مانع إننا نتجوز؟ أو نعمل نفسنا متجوزين؟ ونقعد في شقة ونكوِّن خلية الجهاز الفني؟

- لا معنديش مانع.

واضح إن انا كنت عبيطة أكتر من اللازم، هو كان عنده 22 سنة وانا بعد شهر حاتمِّ 18 سنة، فقال لي:

- بس لازم نعمل عقد جواز.

- نعمل، مش مشكلة.

قطعًا هو لاحظ إن انا أقل وعيًا من تصوُّره لأنه قال:

- ممكن نعمل جواز عرفي بشهود، لأنه مستحيل نعمل جواز حقيقي بمأذون من غير أوراق.

أنا دلوقت باتساءل إيه هي الأوراق اللي كانت ناقصة، عبد الستار كان هربان من البوليس وبيدوروا عليه مختفي في الحياة السرية للتمويه علشان ما يقبضوش عليه، أوراقه هو اللي ناقصة ولَّا أوراقي أنا اللي ناقصة؟

في يوم، اتعمل عقد الجواز العرفي في بيت أحمد الرفاعي، كان ساكن مع درية مراته في القصر العيني من ناحية المنيرة قدام الشارع اللي بيروح الجامعة، حارة صغيرة جوه. بَرضُه مكان غلط، ما كانش المفروض إن انا أروح الحتت دي علشان لو فيه بوليس سياسي مراقبهم بيلاحظني على طول. الجواز دا كله فيه عدم نضج ونوع من الاستغلال، لأن واحدة أجنبية ماشية في السيدة زينب ملفتة للنظر، الجواز ما ساعدش في التمويه. على أي حال اتعمل عقد الجواز بوجود أحمد الرفاعي كشاهد وأنور عبد الملك الشاهد التاني اللي لازم أقول إن لما بافتكره دلوقت كان الوحيد اللي مش مرتاح للعملية دي كلها.

عبد الستار استريح كدا وبقيت أقابله في بيت السيدة زينب.

ابتديت انزعج من العلاقة دي اللي دخلت فيها، من ناحية إيه؟ بعد أسبوع عشر أيام عبد الستار قال لي إن عبد النبي وامه ناس فقرا، فحقتي لما آجي أجيب معايا كيلو رز أو كيلو سكر، شوية شاي، بقالة زي دي. أنا ما كانش عندي فلوس، باشتغل سكرتيرة وفي بداية الشغل والمفروض حيزودوني بعد مدة، لكن باقبض ستة جنيه وبادِّي الفلوس للبيت، لابويا وامي، فمش عارفة أعمل ازاي علشان أجيب رز وسكر. عندنا في البيت فيه دولاب صغير بيحطوا فيه مثلًا اتنين كيلو سكر خزين غير اللي في علبة كل يوم، خدت كيلو سكر ومش عارفة شاي ولَّا إيه تاني من خزين البيت. حسيت مش مظبوط أعمل كدا في أهلي وحسيت إن دي سرقة، وأمي قعدت تسأل: «إنتِ خدت السكر؟ طب إنتَ خدت السكر؟» ليَّ ولابويا ولـ«برتو» اللي كان عنده 13 سنة، وانا أقول لا، كلنا بنقول لا، وبقى لغز في البيت إزاي ممكن يختفي السكر، لغز إن تموين يختفي من البيت. كان عقلي صغير، والله مش عارفة إيه اللي حصل لي، بس عملتها مرة وبعد كدا ما عملتهاش تاني وابتديت أحاول اشتري.

الفترة دي ما استمرتش كتير، يوم تلاتين مارس 1949 - عيد ميلادي الـ18 وكان المفروض آخر النهار أرجع البيت ونحتفل مع أهلي - وانا خارجة من الشغل الساعة واحدة عبد الستار اتصل بيَّ وقال عندنا اجتماع خلية في السيدة زينب. ركبت الترماي اللي بيروح من شارع التحرير لغاية ميدان السيدة زينب. كنت حفظت السكة وأصبح مفيش داعي إن عبد الستار يقابلني ويمشي قدامي في الشوارع. وصلت بيت عبد النبي، كان فيه شوية سندوتشات فول وطعمية على المكتب علشان نتغدى ونبتدي شغل، يعني اجتماع خلية، يمكن كان فيه أوراق مطبوعة على الترابيزة مع السندوتشات؟ يا دوبك أنا قعدت على المكتب ولقيت الباب اتفتح واربع خمس رجالة دخلوا البيت وانتشروا في كل حتة وواحد مسكني من دراعي. مش فاكرة لو أم عبد النبي فتحت الباب ولَّا هم اقتحموا، كنت قاعدة بالظبط زي ما انا قاعدة قدامك دلوقت، عبد الستار قام وقف، فهم أسرع مني، مسكوه هو كمان وابتدوا يفتشوا البيت. فين وفين لما فهمت ان دا البوليس، رجالة لابسين مدني وانا في حالة الـshock - صدمة - حصل لي نوع من البلادة أو الشلل في المشاعر والأفكار، اكتشفت إن بابطل افكر وما باشعرش ولا بالخوف ولا بالزعل ولا بافهم أي حاجة. فعلًا فضلت واقفة كأن إيه باتفرج على فيلم، مش على أحداث بتحصل لي وانا جزء منها. خدوا عبد النبي، قبضوا عليه هو كمان، وعرفت بعدين إنه يا عيني كان شيوعي مبتدئ ويا دوب مترشح للعضوية، فكان زعلان جدًّا من خراب بيته من تحت راس عبد الستار الطويلة. وخدوا عبد الستار الطويلة طبعًا وما شفتوش تاني إلا في المحكمة لما اتعرضت قضيتنا.

 

Read more from the March 2020 issue

from the March 2020 issue

Read more from the March 2020 issue
from the March 2020 issue

Read more from the March 2020 issue
from the March 2020 issue

Read more from the March 2020 issue
from the March 2020 issue

Read more from the March 2020 issue
from the March 2020 issue

Read more from the March 2020 issue
from the March 2020 issue

Read more from the March 2020 issue
from the March 2020 issue

Read more from the March 2020 issue

from the February 2020 issue

Reviewed by Matt Hanson

At once funny and bleak, this novel by the Iraq-born Dutch novelist draws on his personal experiences to expose the cruel and often absurd procedural challenges that immigrants must endure.

Often associated with dramatic images of war and daunting journeys undertaken amid precarious circumstances, the experience of contemporary migration and asylum-seeking gains an unexpected Beckettian tone in Two Blankets, Three Sheets, an engrossing and exasperating novel by the Iraq-born Dutch novelist Rodaan Al Galidi. The first of Al Galidi’s works to be translated into English, the book straddles the line between fiction and memoir as it draws on the author’s own experience as a refugee in the Netherlands to construct a tale defined by protracted delays and seemingly endless waiting. Citizenship and the right to settle in a foreign country appear elusive to Al Galidi’s characters, goals that they seem incapable of attaining but unwilling (or in no condition) to give up, the geopolitical equivalent of Beckett’s existential allegory about the ever-awaited, ever-postponed Godot.

After fleeing Saddam Hussein’s Iraq to avoid military service, Samir Karim finds himself caught in a seemingly insurmountable bureaucratic maze as he tries to settle in a new country. Seven years of frustrated hopes and failed efforts finally lead him to Schiphol Airport, in Amsterdam, where he arrives in 1998, counting on the Dutch reputation for receptiveness to asylum seekers. Samir soon discovers, however, that he is but one of many people arriving there with such expectations, and that the process for deciding who will be granted the coveted residency status is by no means as simple or swift as he might hope.

A new and strenuously long period of waiting then begins in the purgatorial limbo of the Asylum Seeker Center, where quotas on the distribution of blankets, sheets, aspirin, and condoms are carefully enforced and only very cleverly bypassed. These strictly controlled rations of basic goods give the novel its title and determine the daily life of its characters down to the most intimate details: “This meant an asylum seeker had the right to three orgasms and six headaches per day,” Al Galidi wryly remarks.  

Narrating Samir’s travels, with a focus on a period spent homeless and displaced in Southeast Asia on the run from immigration police, Al Galidi exposes the underbelly of United Nations idealism by chronicling the underground world of passport counterfeiting and the black market for immigration. Two Blankets, Three Sheets charts a geographical and psychological road map through the wildest country on the planet: statelessness.

Although written as a novel, Al Galidi’s book often resembles an eyewitness’s critique of international refugee law and institutions, written with equal amounts of earnestness and style. His is a dogged assertion of the personality and humor of the contemporary immigrant, relating his survival of refugee resettlement and the trials of restarting life in a new country, something that many of those he met in transit were not so lucky to achieve. Safe but scarred, he employs a satirical edge to cut through the euphemisms of politicians and international organizations to tell a story that is at once funny and bleak.

Al Galidi judges the judges, lampooning the labyrinthine and often absurd Dutch system for registering asylum seekers. Even the most apparently trivial bureaucratic procedures expose cultural gaps and economic inequities between immigrants and state officials; matters easily resolved in Europe aren’t always so simple in migrants’ countries of origin. For example, calling his mother en route to Amsterdam, Samir realizes they do not even know each other’s ages. When he asks for hers, she responds, “Eight wars.” Later, after suffering in a cold cell, he comes face-to-face with an immigration officer to whom he must explain that Iraqis do not have family names but are rather given a first name that precedes the names of their fathers and grandfathers. “Surely a civil servant working for the immigration services should know that among adult Iraqis, half have July 1 as their birth date, and the other half has January 1,” Al Galidi writes acerbically.

To avoid deportation, Samir flushes his passport down the toilet after landing in Amsterdam—destroying his documents is an attempt to leave the past behind and begin life anew. But as Al Galidi remarks, immigrants are, as ever, stuck between an impossible return and a painful birth into a new life in a foreign country.

The novel’s colorful range of characters allows Al Galidi to depict the multifarious (and often unsavory) experiences and opinions of detainees, migrants, leisure travelers, and locals in Amsterdam, Baghdad, Bangkok, and elsewhere. They collectively inform and enrich the emotional subtext of the Asylum Seeker Center, where the interminable wait is alleviated by the temporary relief of sex or instantly and tragically terminated by suicide.

Al Galidi lays bare and attempts to cut through the veils of ignorance that separate the refugees he spotlights from the officials and state agents who cling mechanically to bureaucratic procedures, rarely swayed by compassion.

Al Galidi wrote the novel in Dutch, which he taught himself despite being forbidden to attend language classes as an undocumented asylum seeker. Two Blankets, Three Sheets is a work of clean, spare prose, written in a matter-of-fact tone. The story sometimes feels less like a narrative than an essay, meandering through loose threads of thought toward a resolution as anticlimactic as much of the plot, or lack thereof. It is a labor of patience as dogged, we may think, as the experience of waiting for asylum for nine years.

“People might ask me if this is my story, to which I will say: no. But if I’m asked if this is also my story, then I will say wholeheartedly: yes,” Al Galidi writes in the foreword to his novel, denying exclusive rights to the suffering that he details. Through this homage, as it were, to his tragicomic immigration to Europe—one darkened by human rights abuses the world over, whether in broad daylight on the streets of Iraq or behind closed doors in Holland—Al Galidi fearlessly tells the tale of one man’s departure from all that is familiar to him and his attempt to find a new home. Two Blankets, Three Sheets is a tale of belonging and what it means to be human in a world that deems people less important than government protocols.

from the February 2020 issue

Read more from the February 2020 issue

from the February 2020 issue

Read more from the February 2020 issue
from the February 2020 issue

Read more from the February 2020 issue
from the February 2020 issue

Read more from the February 2020 issue
from the February 2020 issue

Read more from the February 2020 issue

from the February 2020 issue

Read more from the February 2020 issue
from the February 2020 issue

Like what you read? Help WWB bring you the best new writing from around the world.