Skip to content
Words Without Borders “stands as a monument to international collaboration and a shared belief in artistic possibility.”
— 2018 Whiting Literary Magazine Prize Citation

Book Reviews

April 2012

Etgar Keret’s “Suddenly, a Knock on the Door”

Reviewed by Andrew Seguin

If a man comes knocking at your door to steal your magic goldfish, what do you do?

Andrey Kurkov’s “The General’s Thumb”

Reviewed by Christopher Tauchen

A retired general is found dead in central Kiev—hanged, apparently, from a giant Coca-Cola advertising balloon.

March 2012

Osamu Dazai’s “Schoolgirl”

Reviewed by Mythili G. Rao

Hardly anything about this book seems to have aged, least of all the narrator herself, who is perfectly preserved somewhere along the road to adolescence.

Jan Phillip Sendker’s “The Art of Hearing Heartbeats”

Reviewed by Malcolm Forbes

Sendker tells the story of an incorruptible love, forged by two kindred spirits, set against the rustic yet lushly exotic backdrop of Southeast Asia

February 2012

Friedrich Christian Delius’s “Portrait of the Mother as a Young Woman”

Reviewed by Rosamund Hunter

Christian Delius confirms his facility with experimental form and skillfully creates a varied and textured experience for the reader

César Aira’s “Varamo”

Reviewed by Heather Cleary

What is it that we do, really, when we write? And why can’t a fish be embalmed to look like it’s playing a tiny piano?

Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky’s “The Letter Killers Club”

Reviewed by Christopher Tauchen

To the members of the Letter Killers Club, letters of the alphabet are the prison cells of concepts, and they need to be destroyed.

January 2012

Alexandra Chreiteh’s “Always Coca-Cola”

Reviewed by Emma Garman

"Always Coca-Cola" comes off as a work of searing intensity that powerfully conjures the atmosphere of contemporary Beirut.

Admiel Kosman’s “Approaching You in English”

Reviewed by E.C. Belli

Sitting in any of the rooms that is each poem in "Approaching You In English" you’ll notice a tear in the ceiling; none of these poems are sealed shut

December 2011

Dubravka Ugresic’s “Karaoke Culture”

Reviewed by Jean Harris

Part of the allure is for the amateur to wrest the microphone away from the stars and, for a moment, to take their place in the limelight.

Tomás Eloy Martínez’s “Purgatory”

Reviewed by Anderson Tepper

On a certain level, "Purgatory" is a metaphorical ghost story—a meditation on loss, invisibility, and vanishing

November 2011

Abdourahman Waberi’s “Passage of Tears”

Reviewed by Anderson Tepper

On its most immediate level, "Passage of Tears" is coiled tight with the tensions of a thriller.

Jose Donoso’s “The Lizard’s Tale”

Reviewed by Megan Berkobien

In many ways, "The Lizard’s Tale" is an exercise in concealment through regeneration, or adaptation

Anja Utler’s “engulf – enkindle”

Reviewed by E.C. Belli

Utler’s volume snares readers with a haunted, elliptical syntax. The words walk through these poems as in a preserve

Zoran Drvenkar’s “Sorry”

Reviewed by Nina Herzog

Rare is the thriller that surpasses the limits of genre fiction. But Zoran Drvenkar’s Sorry is one such book: a thriller on its face, but also a thoughtful study in guilt and innocence, violence and redemption.

October 2011

Meir Shalev’s “My Russian Grandmother and her American Vacuum Cleaner”

Reviewed by Emma Garman

Happily for psychological posterity and for us, Tonia Ben-Barak and her never-ending battle against grime have been commemorated by her grandson

Juan Pablo Villalobos’s “Down the Rabbit Hole”

Reviewed by Thomas Bunstead

"Down the Rabbit Hole" is told from the point of view not of a gangster, a cop or a prostitute, but that of a young child.

September 2011

Eduardo Chirinos’s “Reasons for Writing Poetry”

Reviewed by E.C. Belli

At the heart of "Reasons for Writing Poetry," there is a figure: ostensibly, it’s all zebra from the waist down, but from there up, the Okapi, as it’s called, looks like a giraffe

Raymond Roussel’s “Impressions of Africa”

Reviewed by Stefanie Sobelle

Imagine an extravagant pageant during which a marksman shoots off the top of a soft-boiled egg

Sergio Chejfec’s “My Two Worlds”

Reviewed by Jennifer Croft

Technology, for one, has begun to batter life’s perfect syntax

Page 10 of 19 pages ‹ First  < 8 9 10 11 12 >  Last ›

Like what you read? Help WWB bring you the best new writing from around the world.