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Words Without Borders “stands as a monument to international collaboration and a shared belief in artistic possibility.”
— 2018 Whiting Literary Magazine Prize Citation

Book Reviews

February 2018

Yoko Tawada’s Dystopian Novel “The Emissary” Delivers a Bitingly Smart Satire of Present-Day Japan

Reviewed by Andrew Hungate

In a Japan that has once again closed its borders to the outside world, the infant Mumei and his great-grandfather Yoshiro face the perils of a dysfunctional society that seems hauntingly familiar

Well-Meaning Plans Give Way to Destructive Obsessions in Andrés Barba’s “The Right Intention”

Reviewed by Jeff Tompkins

The destructive consequences of his character's obsessions, traced with an almost clinical precision, are the substance of Barba’s absorbing, unnerving stories.

January 2018

In Sangeeta Bandyopadhyay’s “Abandon,” a Destitute Woman’s Desire to Write Clashes with Motherhood

Reviewed by Darren Huang

Since her debut novel, Shankini (2006), the Indian writer Sangeeta Bandyopadhyay has been exploring female sexuality with an uncompromising and subversive vision.

Pastoral Scenes with an Intimation of Apocalypse in “Untimely” Poems and Prints of Bohuslav Reynek

Reviewed by Meghan Forbes

"The Well at Morning" offers a selection of Reynek's poems and prints that spans five decades.

December 2017

“Into English”: A Collection of World Literature That Debunks Age-Old Translation Myths

Reviewed by Kasia Szymanska

Books such as Into English help us to understand how translation transforms our reading and how it changes us, too.

The Torn Gaze: Elke Erb’s Poems Take a Close Look at Different Ways of Seeing

Reviewed by Andrew Shields

Elke Erb is a poet of observation, and her observations often lead quickly and vividly to problems of the act of observing.

In “Using Life,” Ahmed Naji Imagined a Riveting Ride across a Dystopian Cairo, Then He Was Arrested

Reviewed by Mary Catherine Ford

The trial and sentence condemning Naji to prison for his work sparked protests in Egypt last year and brought his work international attention.

November 2017

From Excess to Ascesis: Ryszard Krynicki’s Verses Confront the Perils and Ruins of History

Reviewed by Sean Gasper Bye

Even as the early raging poet's later work opened to a broader set of concerns, it's clear he never lost his desire to challenge simplistic narratives and to ask difficult questions.

October 2017

The Well-Stocked Mind: In Juan Benet’s Essays, a Magisterial and Daunting Exploration of the Form

Reviewed by Anne Posten

In "The Construction of the Tower of Babel," the Spanish writer tackles Bruegel, the Bible, and the necessity of treason

Beyond the Rice Fields: A Sweeping Look at the History of Slavery and Modernization in Madagascar

Reviewed by Kate Prengel

Malagasy writer Naivo's ambitious historical novel grapples with love, colonialism, and the transformation of a society.

September 2017

Solid but Yielding: Ursula Andkjær Olsen’s “Third-Millennium Heart”

Reviewed by Allison Grimaldi-Donahue

Olsen and Jensen create a world in which humans, reconfigured as animal machines, somehow assume their most human form.

A Tale of Displacement and Dissolution: Rodrigo Hasbún’s “Affections”

Reviewed by David Varno

Is it ever possible to leave the past behind and restart one’s life?

July 2017

“Black Moses” by Alain Mabanckou

Reviewed by Emily Lever

The story of the life of a Congolese orphan.

June 2017

“A Fortune Foretold” by Agneta Pleijel

Reviewed by Allison Grimaldi-Donahue

A prophecy is received by a beloved aunt, a prophecy that her young niece eagerly waits to see fulfilled.

“Inheritance from Mother” by Minae Mizumura

Reviewed by Michelle Kyoko Crowson

Minae Mizumura’s Inheritance from Mother is a literature lover’s novel and a translator’s novel.

“The Hunger in Plain View: Selected Poems” by Ester Naomi Perquin

Reviewed by John W. W. Zeiser

A Dutch poet laureate offers her unique, subtle, fascinating, sometimes weird, and sometimes creepy voice for our consideration.

May 2017

“The Revolution of the Moon” by Andrea Camilleri

Reviewed by J. A. Tyler

A tragicomic parable of justice.

April 2017

“The Accusation” by Bandi

Reviewed by John W. W. Zeiser

Stories that shine a light on the dark half of the Korean peninsula.

March 2017

“The Amazing Story of the Man Who Cycled from India to Europe for Love” by Per J. Andersson

Reviewed by Camila M. Santos

An against-all-odds love story from India, by way of Sweden.

“The Impossible Fairy Tale” by Han Yujoo

Reviewed by Ariell Cacciola

A fresh and terrifying exploration of the ethics of art making and of the stinging consequences of neglect.

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