Skip to content
Words Without Borders is one of the inaugural Whiting Literary Magazine Prize winners!

Contributor

Sean Gasper Bye, Francisco Cantú, José Garcia, David and Nicole Ball, and Saskia Vogel

Sean Gasper Bye is a translator of Polish, French, and Russian literature. His translation of Watercolours by Lidia Ostałowska is forthcoming from Zubaan Books, and his translation of History of a Disappearance by Filip Springer was published in April by Restless Books. His translations of fiction, reportage, and drama have appeared in Words without BordersCatapultContinents, and elsewhere. He is a winner of the 2016 Asymptote Close Approximations Prize. Since 2014, he has been literature and humanities curator at the Polish Cultural Institute New York.

Francisco Cantú served as a border patrol agent for the United States Border Patrol from 2008 to 2012. He is a former Fulbright fellow and the recipient of a 2017 Whiting Award. His essays and translations appear frequently in Guernica, and his work can also be found in The Best American Essays 2016, Ploughshares, Orion, and This American Life. He lives in Tucson, Arizona. His debut memoir, The Line Becomes a River, will be published by Riverhead Books in February 2018.

José Garcia is a second-year fiction student at the creative writing program at The New School. His writing and interviews have appeared in Guernica, Lit Hub, and The Millions. He’s a Fulbright scholar from Guatemala. 

David Ball and Nicole Ball have signed three book-length translations together, most recently Abdourahman A. Waberi’s Passage of Tears (Seagull Books, 2011) and In the United States of Africa (University of Nebraska Press, 2009). They have also cotranslated half a dozen shorter pieces by Waberi for journals such as Words without Borders, the Literary ReviewAGNI, and Calaloo. David’s own booklength translations include Alfred Jarry’s Ubu the King in The Norton Anthology of Drama (2009) and Darkness Moves: An Henri Michaux Anthology, 1927-1984, which won the Modern Language Association’s prize for outstanding literary translation in 1996. David translated three stories in Haiti Noir (Akashic Books, 2011).

Saskia Vogel is from Los Angeles and lives in Berlin, where she works as a writer and Swedish-to-English literary translator. She has written on the themes of gender, power, and sexuality for publications such as GrantaThe White ReviewThe Offing, and The Quietus. Her translations include work by leading female authors, such as Katrine Marcal, Karolina Ramqvist and the modernist eroticist Rut Hillarp. Previously, she worked in London as Granta magazine’s global publicist and in Los Angeles as an editor at the AVN Media Network, where she reported on the business of pornography and adult pleasure products.

Like what you read? Help WWB bring you the best new writing from around the world.