Skip to content
Congratulations to 2021 Ottaway Award winner Naveen Kishore! Learn more.

July/August 2021

Backstories: Afro-Italian Women Writers

Image: Nazanin Rastan, "Maggio." Courtesy of the artist.

This issue presents writing by Afro-Italian women. In the face of xenophobic rhetoric and policies, Black Italians have pushed their country to confront its colonial past and engage with its present diversity. The writers featured here plumb both contemporary and historical experiences of Blackness within Italy. Igiaba Scego recalls her experience in the Italian school system as the Black daughter of a Somali immigrant. Ubah Cristina Ali Farah depicts a Muslim teen in Rome discovering an unexpected connection to an alleged terrorist. Marie Moïse describes her search for her Haitian roots in her doubly displaced family history. And Djarah Kan gives voice to a Malian immigrant murdered by a Calabrian white supremacist. We thank our guest editors, Candice Whitney and Barbara Ofosu-Somuah, who with their fellow translators Aaron Robertson and Hope Campbell Gustafson provide an instructive introduction.  

feature

Book Reviews

Returning Home in Palestine: On Sahar Khalifeh’s “My First and Only Love”

Reviewed by Max Radwin

A new novel by the celebrated Palestinian writer travels back and forth in time, across decades, examining the way family, politics, and friendship in her homeland are shaped by violence and war.

A Pioneer of Decolonial Poetry, Jorgenrique Adoum Finally Gets His Book-length (Post)English Debut

Reviewed by Olivia Lott

Linguistic experimentation and political rebellion went hand in hand in the work of the Ecuadorian Adoum, a leading figure of the Latin American neo-avant-garde who wrote his verses in what he called "postspanish."

Recent Issues

Backstories: Afro-Italian Women Writers

The Queer Issue XII

Movement and Multiplicity: Writing from Mauritania

On the Edge: Writing from Iceland

Built on Longing: Writing from Galicia

#Russophonia: New Writing in Russian

International Black Voices on Race and Racism

Coming into Focus: Sudanese Women Writers

Like what you read? Help WWB bring you the best new writing from around the world.